Does the Repressor Coping Style Predict Lower Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms?

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Does the Repressor Coping Style Predict Lower Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms?

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Title: Does the Repressor Coping Style Predict Lower Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms?
Author: McNally, Richard J.; Hatch, John P.; Cedillos, Elizabeth M.; Luethcke, Cynthia A.; Baker, Monty T.; Peterson, Alan L.; Litz, Brett T.

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Citation: McNally, Richard J., John P. Hatch, Elizabeth M. Cedillos, Cynthia A. Luethcke, Monty T. Baker, Alan L. Peterson, and Brett T. Litz. 2011. Does the repressor coping style predict lower posttraumatic stress symptoms? Military Medicine 176(7): 752-756.
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Abstract: We tested whether a continuous measure of repressor coping style predicted lower posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 122 health care professionals serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Zero-order correlational analyses indicated that predeployment repressor coping scores negatively predicted postdeployment PTSD symptoms, \(r_s = -0.29, p = 0.001\), whereas predeployment Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores did not predict postdeployment PTSD symptoms, \(r_s = -0.13, p = 0.14\). However, predeployment trait anxiety was chiefly responsible for the association between repressor coping and PTSD symptom severity, \(r_s = 0.38, p = 0.001\). Four percent of the subjects qualified for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Although service members with relatively higher PTSD scores had lower repressor coping scores than did the other subjects, their level of predeployment anxiety was chiefly responsible for this relationship. Knowing someone's predeployment level of trait anxiety permits better prediction of PTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed service members than does knowing his or her level of repressive coping.
Published Version: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/amsus/zmm/2011/00000176/00000007/art00012
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22128715
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8886765

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6929]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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