Serum Vitamin D Levels are not Predictive of the Progression of Chronic Liver Disease in Hepatitis C Patients with Advanced Fibrosis

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Serum Vitamin D Levels are not Predictive of the Progression of Chronic Liver Disease in Hepatitis C Patients with Advanced Fibrosis

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Title: Serum Vitamin D Levels are not Predictive of the Progression of Chronic Liver Disease in Hepatitis C Patients with Advanced Fibrosis
Author: Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Delgado-Borrego, Aymin; Corey, Kathleen Elizabeth; Zheng, Zheng; Dienstag, Jules Leonard; Chung, Raymond Taeyong

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Citation: Corey, Kathleen E., Hui Zheng, Jorge Mendez-Navarro, Aymin Delgado-Borrego, Jules L. Dienstag, and Raymond T. Chung. 2012. Serum vitamin D levels are not predictive of the progression of chronic liver disease in Hepatitis C patients with advanced fibrosis. PLoS ONE 7(2): e27144.
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Abstract: In animal models and human cross-sectional studies, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with liver disease progression. Vitamin D supplementation has been suggested as a treatment to prevent disease progression. We sought to evaluate the role of vitamin D levels in predicting chronic liver disease development. We conducted a nested case-control study of vitamin D levels in subjects with (cases) and without (controls) liver histologic progression or clinical decompensation over the course of the HALT-C Trial. Vitamin D levels were measured at 4 points over 45 months. 129 cases and 129 aged-matched controls were included. No difference in baseline vitamin D levels were found between cases and controls. (44.8 ng/mL vs. 44.0 ng/mL, P = 0.74). Vitamin D levels declined in cases and controls over time (P = 0.0005), however, there was no difference in the level of decline (P = 0.37). Among study subjects with diabetes mellitius, baseline vitamin D levels were higher in cases, 49.9 ng/mL, than controls, 36.3 ng/mL. (P = 0.03) In addition, baseline vitamin D levels were higher in black case subjects, 32.7 ng/mL, than in black control subjects, 25.2 ng/mL (P = 0.08) No difference in vitamin D levels was found between patients with and without progression of hepatitis C-associated liver disease over 4 years. Our data do not suggest any role for vitamin D supplementation in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C and raise the possibility that higher vitamin D levels may be associated with disease progression.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027144
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3281016/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9361514

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