Association of Body Mass Index in Early Adulthood and Middle Age with Future Site-Specific Cancer Mortality: The Harvard Alumni Health Study

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Association of Body Mass Index in Early Adulthood and Middle Age with Future Site-Specific Cancer Mortality: The Harvard Alumni Health Study

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Title: Association of Body Mass Index in Early Adulthood and Middle Age with Future Site-Specific Cancer Mortality: The Harvard Alumni Health Study
Author: Batty, G. D.; Gray, L.; Lee, I-Min; Sesso, Howard David

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Gray, L., I-M. Lee, H. D. Sesso, and G. D. Batty. 2012. Association of body mass index in early adulthood and middle age with future site-specific cancer mortality: The Harvard Alumni Health Study. Annals of Oncology 23(3): 754-759.
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Abstract: Background:: The association between adiposity in early adulthood and subsequent development of specific malignancies is unclear. Further, the potential for mediation by adiposity in middle age has not been well examined. In a rare study, we investigated the association of body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood with mortality from several site-specific cancers. Design: In the Harvard Alumni Health Study cohort, 19 593 males had a physical examination at the university between 1914 and 1952 (mean age: 18.4 years) and returned a questionnaire in 1962 or 1966 (mean age = 45.1 years). BMI was computed using weight (kg)/\(height^2\) (\(m^2\)) at both time points. Vital status follow up continued for a maximum of 82 years. Results: Positive early adulthood cancer mortality gradients by BMI were found for all malignancies combined (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–1.17 for a one standard deviation increase in early adulthood BMI), and for lung (HR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.10–1.40) and skin (HR = 1.29; 95% CI = 0.96–1.75) cancers. There were also apparent associations for cancers of the oesophagus and urogenital sites. Mediation by BMI in middle age was found to be minimal. Conclusion: Higher BMI in early adulthood appears to be a direct risk factor for selected malignancies several decades later.
Published Version: doi:10.1093/annonc/mdr270
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3331729/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9793860

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