Spatial Heterogeneity in the Effects of Immigration and Diversity on Neighborhood Homicide Rates

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Spatial Heterogeneity in the Effects of Immigration and Diversity on Neighborhood Homicide Rates

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Title: Spatial Heterogeneity in the Effects of Immigration and Diversity on Neighborhood Homicide Rates
Author: Sampson, Robert J.; Graif, Corina

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Graif, Corina and Robert J. Sampson. 2010. Spatial heterogeneity in the effects of immigration and diversity on neighborhood homicide rates. Homicide Studies 13(3): 242-260.
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Abstract: This article examines the connection of immigration and diversity to homicide by advancing a recently developed approach to modeling spatial dynamics—geographically weighted regression (GWR). In contrast to traditional global averaging, we argue on substantive grounds that neighborhood characteristics vary in their effects across neighborhood space, a process of “spatial heterogeneity.” Much like treatment-effect heterogeneity and distinct from spatial spillover, our analysis finds considerable evidence that neighborhood characteristics in Chicago vary significantly in predicting homicide, in some cases showing countervailing effects depending on spatial location. In general, however, immigrant concentration is either unrelated or inversely related to homicide, whereas language diversity is consistently linked to lower homicide. The results shed new light on the immigration-homicide nexus and suggest the pitfalls of global averaging models that hide the reality of a highly diversified and spatially stratified metropolis.
Published Version: doi:10.1177/1088767909336728
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9804494

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7501]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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