Relationship Between Neck Circumference and Cardiometabolic Parameters in HIV-Infected and non–HIV-Infected Adults

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Relationship Between Neck Circumference and Cardiometabolic Parameters in HIV-Infected and non–HIV-Infected Adults

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dc.contributor.author Rope, Alison M.
dc.contributor.author Fitch, Kathleen V.
dc.contributor.author Stanley, Takara Leah
dc.contributor.author Looby, Sara Elizabeth Dolan
dc.contributor.author Grinspoon, Steven Kyle
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-26T16:43:17Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Fitch, Kathleen V., Takara L. Stanley, Sara E. Looby, Alison M. Rope, and Steven K. Grinspoon. 2011. Relationship between neck circumference and cardiometabolic parameters in HIV-infected and non–HIV-infected adults. Diabetes Care 34(4): 1026-1031. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0149-5992 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9809493
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: Upper body fat is associated with increased cardiometabolic risk. More recently, neck circumference (NC) and/or neck fat have been associated with hyperlipidemia, impaired glucose homeostasis, and hypertension. The objective of this study was to determine whether this relationship is evident in HIV-infected individuals, who often exhibit changes in relative fat distribution, and to determine whether NC is independently associated with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in HIV and non–HIV-infected patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Body composition, including anthropometrics, visceral adipose tissue assessment by CT, and metabolic parameters, including lipids, cIMT, and oral glucose tolerance test, were measured in 174 men and women with HIV infection and 154 non–HIV-infected subjects. NC was measured in triplicate inferior to the laryngeal prominence. RESULTS: In univariate analysis, NC was significantly and positively related to blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c, glucose, and insulin and significantly and negatively related to HDL cholesterol in HIV-infected individuals and HIV-negative control subjects. NC was significantly associated with cIMT in univariate regression analysis among HIV-infected (r = 0.21, P = 0.006) and non–HIV-infected (r = 0.31, P = 0.0001) patients. This relationship remained significant among non–HIV-infected patients (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.001) but not HIV-infected patients in multivariate modeling controlling for age, sex, race, smoking hypertension, glucose, and lipids. CONCLUSIONS: Among both HIV and non–HIV-infected patients, increased NC is strongly associated with decreased HDL and impaired glucose homeostasis. Among non–HIV-infected subjects, NC also predicts increased cIMT when controlling for traditional risk factors. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Diabetes Association en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.2337/dc10-1983 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3064017/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject cardiovascular and metabolic risk en_US
dc.title Relationship Between Neck Circumference and Cardiometabolic Parameters in HIV-Infected and non–HIV-Infected Adults en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal Diabetes Care en_US
dash.depositing.author Stanley, Takara Leah
dc.date.available 2012-10-26T16:43:17Z

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