What Is for Me Is Not for You: Brain Correlates of Intertemporal Choice for Self and Other

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What Is for Me Is Not for You: Brain Correlates of Intertemporal Choice for Self and Other

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dc.contributor.author Albrecht, Konstanze
dc.contributor.author Volz, Kirsten G.
dc.contributor.author Sutter, Matthias
dc.contributor.author Laibson, David I.
dc.contributor.author Yves von Cramon, D.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-30T19:40:30Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Albrecht, Konstanze, Kirsten G. Volz, Matthias Sutter, David I. Laibson, and D. Yves von Cramon. 2011. What is for me is not for you: Brain correlates of intertemporal choice for self and other. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 6(2): 218-255. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1749-5016 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1749-5024 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9972760
dc.description.abstract People have present-biased preferences: they choose more impatiently when choosing between an immediate reward and a delayed reward, than when choosing between a delayed reward and a more delayed reward. Following McClure et al. [McClure, S.M., Laibson, D.I., Loewenstein, G., Cohen, J.D. (2004). Separate neural systems value immediate and delayed monetary rewards. Science, 306, 503.], we find that areas in the dopaminergic reward system show greater activation when a binary choice set includes both an immediate reward and a delayed reward in contrast to activation measured when the binary choice set contains only delayed rewards. The presence of an immediate reward in the choice set elevates activation of the ventral striatum, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and anterior medial prefrontal cortex. These dopaminergic reward areas are also responsive to the identity of the recipient of the reward. Even an immediate reward does not activate these dopaminergic regions when the decision is being made for another person. Our results support the hypotheses that participants show less affective engagement (i) when they are making choices for themselves that only involve options in the future or (ii) when they are making choices for someone else. As hypothesized, we also find that behavioral choices reflect more patience when choosing for someone else. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Economics en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1093/scan/nsq046 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3073390/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject present-biased preferences en_US
dc.subject intertemporal discounting en_US
dc.subject fMRI en_US
dc.subject multiple systems hypothesis en_US
dc.title What Is for Me Is Not for You: Brain Correlates of Intertemporal Choice for Self and Other en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience en_US
dash.depositing.author Laibson, David I.
dc.date.available 2012-11-30T19:40:30Z

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7106]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University

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