Now showing items 1-16 of 16

    • Action Embellishment: An Intention Bias in the Perception of Success 

      Preston, Jesse Lee; Ritter, Ryan S.; Wegner, Daniel M. (American Psychological Association, 2011)
      Naïve theories of behavior hold that actions are caused by an agent’s intentions, and the subsequent success of an action is measured by the satisfaction of those intentions. But when an action is not as successful as ...
    • Distortions of Mind Perception in Psychopathology 

      Gray, Kurt; Jenkins, Adrianna; Heberlein, Andrea; Wegner, Daniel (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2010)
      It has long been known that psychopathology can influence social perception, but a 2D framework of mind perception provides the opportunity for an integrative understanding of some disorders. We examined the covariation ...
    • Effects of Subliminal Priming of Self and God on Self-Attribution of Authorship for Events 

      Dijksterhuis, Ap; Preston, Jesse; Wegner, Daniel; Aarts, Henk (Elsevier, 2008)
      Three studies investigated how subliminally primed thoughts of an agent prior to action can affect ascriptions of authorship for that action. Participants competed against a computer program to remove words from a computer ...
    • The Gravity of Unwanted Thoughts: Asymmetric Priming Effects in Thought Suppression 

      Najmi, Sadia; Wegner, Daniel (Elsevier, 2008)
      An unwanted thought appears to be cued easily by reminders in the environment but often the thought itself seems to cue nothing more than the desire to eliminate it from consciousness. This unusual asymmetry in the way ...
    • Hidden Complications of Thought Suppression 

      Najmi, Sadia; Wegner, Daniel M. (Guilford Press, 2009)
      Although the suppression of thoughts may seem to be an effective solution, this strategy can lead to an exacerbation of the very thought that one is attempting to suppress. This ironic effect is the most obvious unwanted ...
    • How to Think, Say, or Do Precisely the Worst Thing For Any Occasion 

      Wegner, Daniel M. (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2009)
      In slapstick comedy, the worst thing that could happen usually does: The person with a sore toe manages to stub it, sometimes twice. Such errors also arise in daily life, and research traces the tendency to do precisely ...
    • Learning the Futility of the Thought Suppression Enterprise in Normal Experience and in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder 

      Najmi, Sadia; Reese, Hannah Elizabeth; Wilhem, Sabine; Fama, Jeanne Marie; Beck, Celeste; Wegner, Daniel M. (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
      The belief that we can control our thoughts is not inevitably adaptive, particularly when it fuels mental control activities that have ironic unintended consequences. The conviction that the mind can and should be controlled ...
    • Managing Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts In Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Relative Effectiveness Of Suppression, Focused-Distraction, and Acceptance 

      Najmi, Sadia; Riemann, Bradley; Wegner, Daniel M. (Elsevier, 2009)
      Suppression is one of various mental control techniques that people may use to manage unwanted thoughts. Evidence suggests that it is at best unsustainable and at worst counterproductive. This leads to the question: If ...
    • Mistaking Randomness for Free Will 

      Ebert, Jeffrey Paul; Wegner, Daniel M. (Elsevier, 2011)
      Belief in free will is widespread. The present research considered one reason why people may believe that actions are freely chosen rather than determined: they attribute randomness in behavior to free will. Experiment 1 ...
    • The Neural Substrates of Action Identification 

      Marsh, Abigail A.; Kozak, Megan N.; Wegner, Daniel M.; Reid, Marguerite E.; Yu, Henry H.; Blair, Ralph James (Oxford University Press, 2010)
      Mentalization is the process by which an observer views a target as possessing higher cognitive faculties such as goals, intentions and desires. Mentalization can be assessed using action identification paradigms, in which ...
    • One with the Cloud: Why People Mistake the Internet's Knowledge for Their Own 

      Ward, Adrian Frank (2013-09-04)
      The internet is a consistent presence in people's daily lives. As people upload, download, and offload information to and from this cloud mind, the line between people's own minds and the cloud mind of the internet may ...
    • Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression 

      Ie, Amanda Yen Lin (2014-06-06)
      The present research assessed whether levels of depression, anxiety and worry, obsessive-compulsive distress, and psychopathy were differentially related to distinct thought suppression profiles. As a means to achieving ...
    • Psychological Effects of Thought Acceleration 

      Pronin, Emily; Jacobs, Elana; Wegner, Daniel (American Psychological Association, 2008)
      Six experiments found that manipulations that increase thought speed also yield positive affect. These experiments varied in both the methods used for accelerating thought (i.e., instructions to brainstorm freely, exposure ...
    • Reading the Minds of Others: Dissociable Neural Processes and Their Social Consequences 

      Jenkins, Adrianna (2013-02-15)
      The ability to infer the contents of other minds--i.e., to mentalize--is a foundation of human social functioning, allowing individuals to respond to to the hidden thoughts, beliefs, intentions, desires, and feelings ...
    • Thought suppression and self-injurious thoughts and behaviors 

      Najmi, Sadia; Wegner, Daniel; Nock, Matthew K. (Elsevier BV, 2007)
      This study proposes and tests a theoretical model suggesting that the propensity to suppress unwanted thoughts is associated with an increased presence and frequency of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITB). In the ...
    • Time Warp: Authorship Shapes the Perceived Timing of Actions and Events 

      Ebert, Jeffrey P.; Wegner, Daniel M. (Elsevier, 2010)
      It has been proposed that inferring personal authorship for an event gives rise to intentional binding, a perceptual illusion in which one's action and inferred effect seem closer in time than they otherwise would (Haggard, ...