Now showing items 1-20 of 61

    • Abstract Representations of Attributed Emotion: Evidence From Neuroscience and Development 

      Skerry, Amy Elizabeth (2015-05-12)
      Humans can recognize others’ emotions based on overt cues such as facial expressions, affective vocalizations, or body posture, or by recruiting an abstract, causal theory of the conditions that tend to elicit different ...
    • All Numbers Are Not Equal: An Electrophysiological Investigation of Small and Large Number Representations 

      Hyde, Daniel Charles; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 2009)
      Behavioral and brain imaging research indicates that human infants, humans adults, and many nonhuman animals represent large nonsymbolic numbers approximately, discriminating between sets with a ratio limit on accuracy. ...
    • Breaking and Entering: Verb Semantics and Event Structure 

      Geojo, Amy Celine (2015-02-25)
      Any event can be construed from a variety of perspectives. While this flexibility is fundamental to human ingenuity, it poses a challenge for language learners who must discern which meanings are encoded in their language ...
    • Children's Responses to Group-Based Inequalities: Perpetuation and Rectification 

      Olson, Kristina R.; Dweck, Carol S.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Banaji, Mahzarin R. (Guilford Press, 2011)
      The current studies investigate whether, and under what conditions, children engage in system-perpetuating and system-attenuating behaviors when allocating resources to different social groups. In three studies, we presented ...
    • Children's Understanding Of The Relationship Between Addition and Subtraction 

      Gilmore, Camilla K.; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Elsevier, 2008)
      In learning mathematics, children must master fundamental logical relationships, including the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction. At the start of elementary school, children lack generalized understanding ...
    • Children’s Expectations and Understanding of Kinship as a Social Category 

      Spokes, Annie C.; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Frontiers Media S.A., 2016)
      In order to navigate the social world, children need to understand and make predictions about how people will interact with one another. Throughout most of human history, social groups have been prominently marked by kinship ...
    • Children’s multiplicative transformations of discrete and continuous quantities 

      Barth, Hilary; Baron, Andrew; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Carey, Susan E. (Elsevier BV, 2009)
      Recent studies have documented an evolutionarily primitive, early emerging cognitive system for the mental representation of numerical quantity (the analog magnitude system). Studies with non-human primates, human infants, ...
    • Children’s Use of Geometry for Reorientation 

      Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Wiley, 2008)
      Research on navigation has shown that humans and laboratory animals recover their sense of orientation primarily by detecting geometric properties of large-scale surface layouts (e.g. room shape), but the reasons for the ...
    • Cognitive Effects of Language on Human Navigation 

      Shusterman, Anna; Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Elsevier, 2011)
      Language has been linked to spatial representation and behavior in humans, but the nature of this effect is debated. Here, we test whether simple verbal expressions improve 4-year-old children’s performance in a disoriented ...
    • Core foundations of abstract geometry 

      Dillon, Moira Rose; Huang, Y.; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013)
      Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious ...
    • Core knowledge and its limits: The domain of food 

      Shutts, Kristin Beth; Condry, Kirsten F.; Santos, Laurie R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Elsevier BV, 2009)
      Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily ...
    • Core Knowledge and the Emergence of Symbols: The Case of Maps 

      Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Informa UK Limited, 2014)
      Map reading is unique to humans but is present in people of diverse cultures, at ages as young as 4 years old. Here, we explore the nature and sources of this ability and ask both what geometric information young children ...
    • Core Multiplication in Childhood 

      McCrink, Koleen; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Elsevier, 2010)
      A dedicated, non-symbolic, system yielding imprecise representations of large quantities (approximate number system, or ANS) has been shown to support arithmetic calculations of addition and subtraction. In the present ...
    • Core Social Cognition 

      Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Bernier, Emily Pantaleoni; Skerry, Amy (Oxford University Press, 2013)
      Research on human infants and young children has provided evidence for five systems of core knowledge: knowledge of objects and their motions; of agents and their goal-directed actions; of number and the operations of ...
    • Cross-Dimensional Mapping of Number, Length and Brightness by Preschool Children 

      de Hevia, Maria Dolores; Vanderslice, Monica; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Public Library of Science, 2012)
      Human adults in diverse cultures, children, infants, and non-human primates relate number to space, but it is not clear whether this ability reflects a specific and privileged number-space mapping. To investigate this ...
    • The Development of Character Judgments From Faces 

      Cogsdill, Emily (2015-03-30)
      First impressions play a central role in human social interaction. In particular, the face is a rich source of information that perceivers use in making both initial and lasting character judgments. Despite the large and ...
    • The development of language and abstract concepts: The case of natural number. 

      Condry, Kirsten F.; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (American Psychological Association (APA), 2008)
      What are the origins of abstract concepts such as "seven," and what role does language play in their development? These experiments probed the natural number words and concepts of 3-year-old children who can recite number ...
    • The Development of Reasoning About Beliefs: Fact, Preference, and Ideology 

      Heiphetz, Larisa Alexandra; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Harris, Paul Lansley; Banaji, Mahzarin R. (Elsevier BV, 2013)
      The beliefs people hold about the social and physical world are central to self-definition and social interaction. The current research analyzes reasoning about three kinds of beliefs: those that concern matters of fact ...
    • Development of Sensitivity to Geometry in Visual Forms 

      Izard, Véronique; Spelke, Elizabeth S. (Springer Verlag, 2009)
      Geometric form perception has been extensively studied in human children, but it has not been systematically characterized from the perspective of formal geometry. Here, we present the findings of three experiments that ...
    • The Double-Edged Sword of Pedagogy: Instruction Limits Spontaneous Exploration and Discovery 

      Bonawitz, Elizabeth; Shafto, Patrick; Gweon, Hyowon; Goodman, Noah D.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Schulz, Laura (Elsevier, 2011)
      Motivated by computational analyses, we look at how teaching affects exploration and discovery. In Experiment 1, we investigated children’s exploratory play after an adult pedagogically demonstrated a function of a toy, ...