Now showing items 1-4 of 4

    • The Loss of Species: Mangrove Extinction Risk and Geographic Areas of Global Concern 

      Polidoro, Beth A.; Carpenter, Kent E.; Collins, Lorna; Duke, Norman C.; Ellison, Joanna C.; Fernando, Edwino S.; Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Koedam, Nico E.; Livingstone, Suzanne R.; Miyagi, Toyohiko; Moore, Gregg E.; Nam, Vien Ngoc; Ong, Jin Eong; Primavera, Jurgenne H.; Salmo, Severino G., III; Sanciangco, Jonnell C.; Sukardjo, Sukristijono; Yong, Jean Wan Hong; Ellison, Aaron M.; Farnsworth, Elizabeth Jean; Wang, Yamin (Public Library of Science, 2010)
      Mangrove species are uniquely adapted to tropical and subtropical coasts, and although relatively low in number of species, mangrove forests provide at least US $1.6 billion each year in ecosystem services and support ...
    • Next-Generation Field Guides 

      Farnsworth, Elizabeth Jean; Chu, Miyoko; Kress, W. John; Neill, Amanda K.; Best, Jason H.; Pickering, John; Stevenson, Robert D.; Courtney, Gregory W.; VanDyk, John K.; Ellison, Aaron M. (University of California Press, 2013)
      To conserve species, we must first identify them. Field researchers, land managers, educators, and citizen scientists need up-to-date and accessible tools to identify organisms, organize data, and share observations. ...
    • The Relative Contributions of Seed Bank, Seed Rain, and Understory Vegetation Dynamics to the Reorganization of Tsuga Canadensis Forests After Loss due to Logging or Simulated Attack by Adelges tsugae 

      Farnsworth, Elizabeth Jean; Barker-Plotkin, Audrey A.; Ellison, Aaron M. (Canadian Science Publishing, 2012)
      Profound changes are occurring in forests as native insects, nonnative insects, or pathogens irrupt on foundation tree species; comprehensive models of vegetation responses are needed to predict future forest composition. ...
    • Targeted Sampling Increases Knowledge and Improves Estimates of Ant Species Richness in Rhode Island 

      Ellison, Aaron M.; Farnsworth, Elizabeth Jean (Humboldt Field Research Institute, 2014)
      Only 0.7% of 28,205 known New England ant specimens (1861–2011) were from Rhode Island. Consequently, apparent ant species richness of Rhode Island counties was lower than expected based on simple biogeographic models. ...