Now showing items 1-9 of 9

    • Biogeochemical drivers of the fate of riverine mercury discharged to the global and Arctic oceans 

      Zhang, Yanxu; Jacob, Daniel James; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Amos, Helen Marie; Long, Michael Smither; Sunderland, Elynor M (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015)
      Rivers discharge 28 ± 13 Mmol yr1 of mercury (Hg) to ocean margins, an amount comparable to atmospheric deposition to the global oceans. Most of the Hg discharged by rivers is sequestered by burial of benthic sediment in ...
    • Factors Driving Mercury Variability in the Arctic Atmosphere and Ocean over the Past 30 Years 

      Fisher, Jenny A.; Jacob, Daniel James; Soerensen, Anne Laerke; Amos, Helen Marie; Corbitt, Elizabeth Sturges; Streets, David G.; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Yantosca, Robert M.; Sunderland, Elynor M (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)
      [1] Long-term observations at Arctic sites (Alert and Zeppelin) show large interannual variability (IAV) in atmospheric mercury (Hg), implying a strong sensitivity of Hg to environmental factors and potentially to climate ...
    • Gas-Particle Partitioning of Atmospheric Hg(II) and Its Effect on Global Mercury Deposition 

      Amos, Helen Marie; Jacob, Daniel J.; Holmes, C. D.; Fisher, Jenny Allison; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Yantosca, Robert M.; Corbitt, Elizabeth Sturges; Galarneau, E.; Rutter, A. P.; Gustin, M. S.; Steffen, A.; Schauer, J. J.; Graydon, J. A.; Louis, V. L. St.; Talbot, R. W.; Edgerton, E. S.; Zhang, Y.; Sunderland, Elynor M (Copernicus GmbH, 2012)
      Atmospheric deposition of Hg(II) represents a major input of mercury to surface environments. The phase of Hg(II) (gas or particle) has important implications for deposition. We use long-term observations of reactive gaseous ...
    • Global Biogeochemical Implications of Mercury Discharges from Rivers and Sediment Burial 

      Amos, Helen Marie; Jacob, Daniel James; Kocman, David; Horowitz, Hannah Marie; Zhang, Yanxu; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Horvat, Milena; Corbitt, Elizabeth Sturges; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Sunderland, Elynor M (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2014)
      Rivers are an important source of mercury (Hg) to marine ecosystems. Based on an analysis of compiled observations, we estimate global present-day Hg discharges from rivers to ocean margins are 27 plus or minus 13 Mmol a ...
    • Historical Mercury Releases from Commercial Products: Global Environmental Implications 

      Horowitz, Hannah Marie; Jacob, Daniel James; Amos, Helen Marie; Streets, David G.; Sunderland, Elynor M (American Chemical Society (ACS), 2014)
      The intentional use of mercury (Hg) in products and processes (“commercial Hg”) has contributed a large and previously unquantified anthropogenic source of Hg to the global environment over the industrial era, with major ...
    • Legacy Impacts of All-Time Anthropogenic Emissions on the Global Mercury Cycle 

      Amos, Helen Marie; Jacob, Daniel James; Streets, David G.; Sunderland, Elsie M. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)
      Elevated mercury (Hg) in marine and terrestrial ecosystems is a global health concern because of the formation of toxic methylmercury. Humans have emitted Hg to the atmosphere for millennia, and this Hg has deposited and ...
    • Observed decrease in atmospheric mercury explained by global decline in anthropogenic emissions 

      Zhang, Yanxu; Jacob, Daniel James; Horowitz, Hannah Marie; Chen, Long; Amos, Helen Marie; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Slemr, Franz; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Sunderland, Elynor M (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2016)
      Anthropogenic mercury poses risks to humans and ecosystems when converted to methylmercury. A longstanding conundrum has been the apparent disconnect between increasing global emissions trends and measured declines in ...
    • Riverine source of Arctic Ocean mercury inferred from atmospheric observations 

      Fisher, Jenny Allison; Jacob, Daniel J.; Soerensen, Anne Laerke; Amos, Helen Marie; Steffen, Alexandra; Sunderland, Elsie M. (Springer Nature, 2012)
      Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that accumulates in aquatic food webs. Human activities, including industry and mining, have increased inorganic mercury inputs to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Methylation of ...
    • Toward an improved understanding of the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury 

      Amos, Helen Marie (2014-06-06)
      Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxin, has both natural and anthropogenic sources to the environment, and is globally dispersed. Humans have been using Hg since antiquity and continue its use in large quantities, mobilizing ...