Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Cross-Cultural Sex Differences in Post-Conflict Affiliation following Sports Matches 

      Benenson, Joyce Frances; Wrangham, Richard W. (Elsevier BV, 2016)
      The nature of ancestral human social structure and the circumstances in which men or women tend to be more cooperative are subjects of intense debate. The male warrior hypothesis proposes that success in intergroup contests ...
    • Do Young Children Understand Relative Value Comparisons? 

      Benenson, Joyce F.; Markovits, Henry; Whitmore, Bjorn; Van, Christophe; Margolius, Sara; Wrangham, Richard W. (Public Library of Science, 2015)
      Many forms of judgments, such as those used in economic games or measures of social comparison, require understanding relative value, as well as the more complex ability to make comparisons between relative values. To ...
    • Male more than female infants imitate propulsive motion 

      Benenson, Joyce Frances; Tennyson, Robert; Wrangham, Richard W. (Elsevier, 2011)
      Few experimental studies investigate the mechanisms by which young children develop sex-typed activity preferences. Gender self-labeling followed by selective imitation of same-sex models currently is considered a primary ...
    • Males’ Greater Tolerance of Same-Sex Peers 

      Benenson, Joyce Frances; Markovits, Henry; Fitzgerald, Caitlin; Geoffroy, Diana; Flemming, Julianne; Kahlenberg, Sonya Marie; Wrangham, Richard W. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009)
      Three studies were conducted to examine the often-cited conclusion that human females are more sociable than males. Using perceptions of roommates, roommate changes at three collegiate institutions, and an experimental ...
    • Social Exclusion: More Important to Human Females Than Males 

      Benenson, Joyce Frances; Markovits, Henry; Hultgren, Brittney; Nguyen, Tuyet; Bullock, Grace; Wrangham, Richard W. (Public Library of Science, 2013)
      Theoretical models based on primate evidence suggest that social structure determines the costs and benefits of particular aggressive strategies. In humans, males more than females interact in groups of unrelated same-sex ...
    • Strength Determines Coalitional Strategies in Humans 

      Benenson, Joyce Frances; Markovits, Henry; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Wrangham, Richard W. (Royal Society Publishing, 2009)
      Coalitions enhance survival and reproductive success in many social species, yet they generate contradictory impulses. Whereas a coalition increases the probability of successfully obtaining rewards for its members, it ...