Now showing items 17011-17030 of 17274

    • Whole-Genome Sequences of 94 Environmental Isolates of Bacillus cereus Sensu Lato 

      Van der Auwera, Géraldine A.; Feldgarden, Michael; Kolter, Roberto; Mahillon, Jacques (American Society for Microbiology, 2013)
      Bacillus cereus sensu lato is a species complex that includes the anthrax pathogen Bacillus anthracis and other bacterial species of medical, industrial, and ecological importance. Their phenotypes of interest are typically ...
    • Whose Bills? Corporate Interests and Conservative Mobilization Across the U.S. States, 1973-2013 

      Hertel-Fernandez, Alexander W. (2016-05-14)
      In recent decades, conservative groups have become increasingly active in mobilizing corporations to press their interests not just on the U.S. Congress and federal agencies, but also on legislatures in the fifty U.S. ...
    • Whose Ideas? Whose Words? Authorship of Ronald Reagan's Radio Addresses 

      Airoldi, Edoardo Maria; Fienberg, Stephen E.; Skinner, Kiron K. (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2007)
    • Why (So many) Parties? The Logic of Party Formation in Senegal 

      Kelly, Catherine Lena (2014-10-21)
      Political parties proliferated in Senegal and other competitive authoritarian regimes in post-Cold War Africa. This dissertation examines the causes and consequences of that proliferation. Why do so many politicians create ...
    • Why and How Is Health a Human Right? 

      Sen, Amartya (Elsevier, 2008)
    • Why and Wherefore of Increased Scientific Collaboration 

      Freeman, Richard Barry; Ganguli, Ina; Murciano-Goroff, Raviv (2015)
      This paper examines international and domestic collaborations using data from an original survey of corresponding authors and Web of Science data of articles that had at least one US coauthor in the fields of Particle and ...
    • Why are our toes so tiny? Walking, running and the evolution of a short forefoot in the genus Homo 

      Campbell, Rolian; Lieberman, Daniel; Scott, John W. (Oxford University Press, 2006)
      Humans have an extremely short forefoot relative to total foot length. The derived pedal proportions of humans are thought to have evolved in the context of committed bipedalism, but the benefits of shorter toes for walking ...
    • Why are our toes so tiny? Walking, running and the evolution of a short forefoot in the genus Homo 

      Rolian, Campbell; Lieberman, Daniel; Scott, John W. (John Wiley & Sons, 2007)
      Humans have an extremely short forefoot relative to total foot length. The derived pedal proportions of humans are thought to have evolved in the context of committed bipedalism, but the benefits of shorter toes for walking ...
    • Why Are Phenotypic Mutation Rates Much Higher Than Genotypic Mutation Rates? 

      Burger, Richard; Willensdorfer, Martin; Nowak, Martin A. (Genetics Society of America, 2006)
      The evolution of genotypic mutation rates has been investigated in numerous theoretical and experimental studies. Mutations, however, occur not only when copying DNA, but also when building the phenotype, especially when ...
    • Why Are Stabilizations Delayed? 

      Alesina, Alberto; Drazen, Allan (American Economic Association, 1988)
      When a stabilization has significant distributional implications (e.g., tax increases to eliminate a large budget deficit), socioeconomic groups may attempt to shift the burden of stabilization onto other groups. The process ...
    • Why Are There Large Differences Between Models in Global Budgets of Tropospheric Ozone? 

      Wu, Shiliang; Mickley, Loretta J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Yantosca, Robert M.; Rind, David Michael (American Geophysical Union, 2007)
      Global 3-D tropospheric chemistry models in the literature show large differences in global budget terms for tropospheric ozone. The ozone production rate in the troposphere, P(O x ), varies from 2300 to 5300 Tg yr−1 across ...
    • Why Are We Still Producing Paper Floras? 

      Brach, Anthony Robert; Boufford, David E. (Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 2011)
      Advances in online resources and electronic publication provide the sciences with tools to revolutionize education and research (e.g., cataloging, data archiving and access, and identification). Older journals and monographs ...
    • Why are “What” and “Where” Processed by Separate Cortical Visual Systems? A Computational Investigation 

      Rueckl, Jay G.; Cave, Kyle R.; Kosslyn, Stephen Michael (Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1989)
      In the primate visual system, the identification of objects and the processing of spatial information are accomplished by different cortical pathways. The computational properties of this “two-systems” design were explored ...
    • Why Beauty Matters 

      Mobius, Markus; Rosenblat, Tanya (American Economic Association, 2006)
      We decompose the beauty premium in an experimental labor market where “employers” determine wages of “workers” who perform a maze-solving task. This task requires a true skill which we show to be unaffected by physical ...
    • Why Can't We Be More Idiographic in Our Research? 

      Barlow, David H.; Nock, Matthew K. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009)
      Most psychological scientists make inferences about the relations among variables of interest by comparing aggregated data from groups of individuals. Although this method is unarguably a useful one that will continue to ...
    • Why Children and Adults Sometimes (But Not Always) Compute Implicatures 

      Guasti, Maria Teresa; Chierchia, Gennaro; Crain, Stephen; Foppolo, Francesca; Gualmini, Andrea; Meroni, Luisa (Taylor & Francis, 2005)
      Noveck (2001) argued that children even as old as 11 do not reliably endorse a scalar interpretation of weak scalar terms (some, might, or) (cf. Braine & Rumain, 1981; Smith, 1980). More recent studies suggest, however, ...
    • Why Did So Many People Make So Many Ex Post Bad Decisions? The Causes of the Foreclosure Crisis 

      Foote, Christopher L.; Gerardi, Kristopher S.; Willen, Paul S. (Russell Sage Foundation, 2012)
      We present 12 facts about the mortgage crisis. We argue that the facts refute the popular story that the crisis resulted from finance industry insiders deceiving uninformed mortgage borrowers and investors. Instead, we ...
    • Why Do Bigger Firms Receive Faster Drug Approvals? 

      Carpenter, Daniel Paul; Feinstein, Brian; Moore, Colin; Turenne, Marc; Yohai, Ian; Zucker, Evan James (2004)
      We test several explanations for the commonly observed pattern that larger firms receive shorter FDA approval times for the drugs they submit. Candidate explanations include capture and rent-seeking and “external-signals” ...
    • Why Do Companies Pay Dividends? 

      Feldstein, Martin; Green, Jerry (American Economic Association, 1983)
      This paper presents a simple model of market equilibrium to explain why firms that maximize the value of their shares pay dividends even though the funds could instead be retained and subsequently distributed to shareholders ...