Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency

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Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency

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Title: Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency
Author: Böhlke, Mark; Takahashi, Masaya; Maher, Timothy J.; Kim, Jonghan; Li, Yuan; Buckett, Peter D.; Thompson, Khristy J.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

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Citation: Kim, Jonghan, Yuan Li, Peter D. Buckett, Mark Böhlke, Khristy J. Thompson, Masaya Takahashi, Timothy J. Maher, and Marianne Wessling-Resnick. 2012. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency. PLoS ONE 7(3): e33533.
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Abstract: Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of \(MnCl_2\) for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with \(MnCl_2\). Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor \(D_1\) (D1R) levels were reduced and dopamine receptor \(D_2\) (D2R) levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence onmotor impairment due to low iron status.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033533
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3316579/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10058897
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