The Role of the Ubiquitination–Proteasome Pathway in Breast Cancer: Use of Mouse Models for Analyzing Ubiquitination Processes

DSpace/Manakin Repository

The Role of the Ubiquitination–Proteasome Pathway in Breast Cancer: Use of Mouse Models for Analyzing Ubiquitination Processes

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: The Role of the Ubiquitination–Proteasome Pathway in Breast Cancer: Use of Mouse Models for Analyzing Ubiquitination Processes
Author: Rossi, Sabrina; Loda, Massimo

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Rossi, Sabrina, and Massimo Loda. 2003. The role of the ubiquitination–proteasome pathway in breast cancer: Use of mouse models for analyzing ubiquitination processes. Breast Cancer Research 5(1): 16-22.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Turnover of several regulatory proteins results from targeted destruction via ubiquitination and subsequent degradation through the proteosome. The timely and irreversible degradation of critical regulators is essential for normal cellular function. The precise biochemical mechanisms that are involved in protein turnover by ubiquitin-mediated degradation have been elucidated using in vitro assays and cell culture systems. However, pathways that lead to ubiquitination of critical regulatory proteins in vivo are more complex, and have both temporal and tissue-specific differences. In vivo models will allow identification of substrates and enzymes of the ubiquitin–proteosome pathway that play important roles in selected tissues and diseases. In addition, assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of drugs designed to inhibit or enhance protein turnover by ubiquitination requires in vivo models. In the present review we describe selected examples of transgenic and knockout models of proteins that are known either to be regulated by ubiquitin-mediated degradation or to have a catalytic function in this process, and to play an important role in breast cancer. We outline the functions of these proteins in vivo and focus on knowledge gained in the comparison of in vivo behavior predicted from cell-free in vitro data or from experiments conducted in cell culture systems.
Published Version: doi://10.1186/bcr542
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC154128/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10139941
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters