Response of Metallic Pyramidal Lattice Core Sandwich Panels to High Intensity Impulsive Loading in Air

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Response of Metallic Pyramidal Lattice Core Sandwich Panels to High Intensity Impulsive Loading in Air

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Title: Response of Metallic Pyramidal Lattice Core Sandwich Panels to High Intensity Impulsive Loading in Air
Author: Hutchinson, John W.; Dharmasena, Kumar P.; Williams, Keith; Xue, Zhenyu; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

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Citation: Dharmasena, Kumar P., Haydn N. G. Wadley, Keith Williams, Zhenyu Xue, and John W. Hutchinson. 2011. Response of metallic pyramidal lattice core sandwich panels to high intensity impulsive loading in air. International Journal of Impact Engineering 38(5): 275–289.
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Abstract: Small scale explosive loading of sandwich panels with low relative density pyramidal lattice cores has been used to study the large scale bending and fracture response of a model sandwich panel system in which the core has little stretch resistance. The panels were made from a ductile stainless steel and the practical consequence of reducing the sandwich panel face sheet thickness to induce a recently predicted beneficial fluid–structure interaction (FSI) effect was investigated. The panel responses are compared to those of monolithic solid plates of equivalent areal density. The impulse imparted to the panels was varied from 1.5 to 7.6 kPa s by changing the standoff distance between the center of a spherical explosive charge and the front face of the panels. A decoupled finite element model has been used to computationally investigate the dynamic response of the panels. It predicts panel deformations well and is used to identify the deformation time sequence and the face sheet and core failure mechanisms. The study shows that efforts to use thin face sheets to exploit FSI benefits are constrained by dynamic fracture of the front face and that this failure mode is in part a consequence of the high strength of the inertially stabilized trusses. Even though the pyramidal lattice core offers little in-plane stretch resistance, and the FSI effect is negligible during loading by air, the sandwich panels are found to suffer slightly smaller back face deflections and transmit smaller vertical component forces to the supports compared to equivalent monolithic plates.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2010.10.002
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10163030
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