Transfusion-Transmitted Infections

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Transfusion-Transmitted Infections

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Title: Transfusion-Transmitted Infections
Author: Bihl, Florian; Castelli, Damiano; Marincola, Francesco; Dodd, Roger Y; Brander, Christian

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Bihl, Florian, Damiano Castelli, Francesco Marincola, Roger Y. Dodd, and Christian Brander. 2007. Transfusion-transmitted infections. Journal of Translational Medicine 5:25.
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Abstract: Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens.
Published Version: doi://10.1186/1479-5876-5-25
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1904179/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10236033
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