Monocyte Subset Dynamics in Human Atherosclerosis Can Be Profiled with Magnetic Nano-Sensors

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Monocyte Subset Dynamics in Human Atherosclerosis Can Be Profiled with Magnetic Nano-Sensors

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Title: Monocyte Subset Dynamics in Human Atherosclerosis Can Be Profiled with Magnetic Nano-Sensors
Author: Wildgruber, Moritz; Chudnovskiy, Aleksey; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Etzrodt, Martin; Lee, Hakho; Pittet, Mikael J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Croce, Kevin James; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Wildgruber, Moritz, Hakho Lee, Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Tae-Jong Yoon, Martin Etzrodt, Mikael J. Pittet, Matthias Nahrendorf, et al. 2009. Monocyte subset dynamics in human atherosclerosis can be profiled with magnetic nano-sensors. PLoS ONE 4(5): e5663.
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Abstract: Monocytes are circulating macrophage and dendritic cell precursors that populate healthy and diseased tissue. In humans, monocytes consist of at least two subsets whose proportions in the blood fluctuate in response to coronary artery disease, sepsis, and viral infection. Animal studies have shown that specific shifts in the monocyte subset repertoire either exacerbate or attenuate disease, suggesting a role for monocyte subsets as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Assays are therefore needed that can selectively and rapidly enumerate monocytes and their subsets. This study shows that two major human monocyte subsets express similar levels of the receptor for macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSFR) but differ in their phagocytic capacity. We exploit these properties and custom-engineer magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo sensing of monocytes and their subsets. We present a two-dimensional enumerative mathematical model that simultaneously reports number and proportion of monocyte subsets in a small volume of human blood. Using a recently described diagnostic magnetic resonance (DMR) chip with 1 \(\mu\)l sample size and high throughput capabilities, we then show that application of the model accurately quantifies subset fluctuations that occur in patients with atherosclerosis.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0005663
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2680949/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10236188
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