Born Normalization for Fluorescence Optical Projection Tomography for Whole Heart Imaging

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Born Normalization for Fluorescence Optical Projection Tomography for Whole Heart Imaging

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Born Normalization for Fluorescence Optical Projection Tomography for Whole Heart Imaging
Author: Razansky, Daniel; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Fexon, Lyuba; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Vinegoni, Claudio; Pivovarov, Misha; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Vinegoni, Claudio, Daniel Razansky, Jose-Luiz Figueiredo, Lyuba Fexon, Misha Pivovarov, Matthias Nahrendorf, Vasilis Ntziachristos, and Ralph Weissleder. 2009. Born normalization for fluorescence optical projection tomography for whole heart imaging. Journal of Visualized Experiments 28: e1389.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Optical projection tomography is a three-dimensional imaging technique that has been recently introduced as an imaging tool primarily in developmental biology and gene expression studies. The technique renders biological sample optically transparent by first dehydrating them and then placing in a mixture of benzyl alcohol and benzyl benzoate in a 2:1 ratio (BABB or Murray s Clear solution). The technique renders biological samples optically transparent by first dehydrating them in graded ethanol solutions then placing them in a mixture of benzyl alcohol and benzyl benzoate in a 2:1 ratio (BABB or Murray s Clear solution) to clear. After the clearing process the scattering contribution in the sample can be greatly reduced and made almost negligible while the absorption contribution cannot be eliminated completely. When trying to reconstruct the fluorescence distribution within the sample under investigation, this contribution affects the reconstructions and leads, inevitably, to image artifacts and quantification errors.. While absorption could be reduced further with a permanence of weeks or months in the clearing media, this will lead to progressive loss of fluorescence and to an unrealistically long sample processing time. This is true when reconstructing both exogenous contrast agents (molecular contrast agents) as well as endogenous contrast (e.g. reconstructions of genetically expressed fluorescent proteins).
Published Version: doi://10.3791/1389
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2794886/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10265020
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters