Brain Networks of Novelty-Driven Involuntary and Cued Voluntary Auditory Attention Shifting

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Brain Networks of Novelty-Driven Involuntary and Cued Voluntary Auditory Attention Shifting

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Title: Brain Networks of Novelty-Driven Involuntary and Cued Voluntary Auditory Attention Shifting
Author: Tengshe, Chinmayi; Huang, Samantha; Belliveau, John William; Ahveninen, Jyrki Pekka

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Citation: Huang, Samantha, John William Belliveau, Chinmayi Tengshe, and Jyrki Pekka Ahveninen. 2012. Brain networks of novelty-driven involuntary and cued voluntary auditory attention shifting. PLoS ONE 7(8): e44062.
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Abstract: In everyday life, we need a capacity to flexibly shift attention between alternative sound sources. However, relatively little work has been done to elucidate the mechanisms of attention shifting in the auditory domain. Here, we used a mixed event-related/sparse-sampling fMRI approach to investigate this essential cognitive function. In each 10-sec trial, subjects were instructed to wait for an auditory “cue” signaling the location where a subsequent “target” sound was likely to be presented. The target was occasionally replaced by an unexpected “novel” sound in the uncued ear, to trigger involuntary attention shifting. To maximize the attention effects, cues, targets, and novels were embedded within dichotic 800-Hz vs. 1500-Hz pure-tone “standard” trains. The sound of clustered fMRI acquisition (starting at t = 7.82 sec) served as a controlled trial-end signal. Our approach revealed notable activation differences between the conditions. Cued voluntary attention shifting activated the superior intra­­parietal sulcus (IPS), whereas novelty-triggered involuntary orienting activated the inferior IPS and certain subareas of the precuneus. Clearly more widespread activations were observed during voluntary than involuntary orienting in the premotor cortex, including the frontal eye fields. Moreover, we found ­evidence for a frontoinsular-cingular attentional control network, consisting of the anterior insula, inferior frontal cortex, and medial frontal cortices, which were activated during both target discrimination and voluntary attention shifting. Finally, novels and targets activated much wider areas of superior temporal auditory cortices than shifting cues.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044062
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3429427
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10349652
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