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dc.contributor.authorBruneau, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorWoda, Craig B.
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Kevin Patrick
dc.contributor.authorBoneschansker, Leonard
dc.contributor.authorJain, Namrata G.
dc.contributor.authorKochupurakkal, Nora
dc.contributor.authorContreras, Alan Gabriel
dc.contributor.authorSeto, Tatsuichiro
dc.contributor.authorBriscoe, David Michael
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-05T20:51:52Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationBruneau, Sarah, Craig Bryan Woda, Kevin Patrick Daly, Leonard Boneschansker, Namrata Gargee Jain, Nora Kochupurakkal, Alan Gabriel Contreras, Tatsuichiro Seto, and David Michael Briscoe. 2012. Key features of the intragraft microenvironment that determine long-term survival following transplantation. Frontiers in Immunology 3:54.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-3224en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10367419
dc.description.abstractIn this review, we discuss how changes in the intragraft microenvironment serve to promote or sustain the development of chronic allograft rejection. We propose two key elements within the microenvironment that contribute to the rejection process. The first is endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis that serve to create abnormal microvascular blood flow patterns as well as local tissue hypoxia, and precedes endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The second is the overexpression of local cytokines and growth factors that serve to sustain inflammation and, in turn, function to promote a leukocyte-induced angiogenesis reaction. Central to both events is overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is both pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic, and thus drives progression of the chronic rejection microenvironment. In our discussion, we focus on how inflammation results in angiogenesis and how leukocyte-induced angiogenesis is pathological. We also discuss how VEGF is a master control factor that fosters the development of the chronic rejection microenvironment. Overall, this review provides insight into the intragraft microenvironment as an important paradigm for future direction in the field.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3389/fimmu.2012.00054en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3342046/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectendothelial cellen_US
dc.subjectmicrovascular injuryen_US
dc.subjectangiogenesisen_US
dc.subjectvascular endothelial growth factoren_US
dc.subjecthypoxiaen_US
dc.subjectallograft rejectionen_US
dc.subjectchronic allograft rejectionen_US
dc.subjectallograft vasculopathyen_US
dc.titleKey Features of the Intragraft Microenvironment that Determine Long-Term Survival Following Transplantationen_US
dc.typeCommentary or Reviewen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Immunologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorBriscoe, David Michael
dc.date.available2013-03-05T20:51:52Z
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fimmu.2012.00054*
dash.contributor.affiliatedSeto, Tatsuichiro
dash.contributor.affiliatedDaly, Kevin
dash.contributor.affiliatedJain, Namrata G.
dash.contributor.affiliatedWoda, Craig B.
dash.contributor.affiliatedBruneau, Sarah
dash.contributor.affiliatedBriscoe, David
dash.contributor.affiliatedKochupurakkal, Nora


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