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dc.contributor.authorNavaratna, Deepti
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Shu-Zhen
dc.contributor.authorHayakawa, Kazhuhide
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiaoying
dc.contributor.authorGerhardinger, Chiara
dc.contributor.authorLo, Eng H.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-14T17:25:52Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationNavaratna, Deepti, Shu-zhen Guo, Kazhuhide Hayakawa, Xiaoying Wang, Chiara Gerhardinger, and Eng H. Lo. 2011. Decreased cerebrovascular brain-derived neurotrophic factor–mediated neuroprotection in the diabetic brain. Diabetes 60(6): 1789-1796.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-1797en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10405985
dc.description.abstractObjective: Diabetes is an independent risk factor for stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of how diabetes confers that this risk is not fully understood. We hypothesize that secretion of neurotrophic factors by the cerebral endothelium, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is suppressed in diabetes. Consequently, such accrued neuroprotective deficits make neurons more vulnerable to injury. Research Design and Methods: We examined BDNF protein levels in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Levels of total and secreted BDNF protein were quantified in human brain microvascular endothelial cells after exposure to advanced glycation end product (AGE)-BSA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry. In media transfer experiments, the neuroprotective efficacy of conditioned media from normal healthy endothelial cells was compared with AGE-treated endothelial cells in an in vitro hypoxic injury model. Results: Cerebrovascular BDNF protein was reduced in the cortical endothelium in 6-month diabetic rats. Immunohistochemical analysis of 6-week diabetic brain sections showed that the reduction of BDNF occurs early after induction of diabetes. Treatment of brain microvascular endothelial cells with AGE caused a similar reduction in BDNF protein and secretion in an extracellular signal–related kinase-dependent manner. In media transfer experiments, conditioned media from AGE-treated endothelial cells were less neuroprotective against hypoxic injury because of a decrease in secreted BDNF. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that a progressive depletion of microvascular neuroprotection in diabetes elevates the risk of neuronal injury for a variety of central nervous system diseases, including stroke and neurodegeneration.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Diabetes Associationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.2337/db10-1371en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114398/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleDecreased Cerebrovascular Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor–Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Brainen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalDiabetesen_US
dash.depositing.authorLo, Eng H.
dc.date.available2013-03-14T17:25:52Z
dc.identifier.doi10.2337/db10-1371*
dash.contributor.affiliatedGuo, Shu-Zhen
dash.contributor.affiliatedNavaratna, Deepti
dash.contributor.affiliatedGerhardinger, Chiara
dash.contributor.affiliatedWang, Xiaoying
dash.contributor.affiliatedLo, Eng


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