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dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Satoru
dc.contributor.authorTakai-Igarashi, Takako
dc.contributor.authorFukuoka, Yutaka
dc.contributor.authorWall, Dennis Paul
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Hiroshi
dc.contributor.authorTonellato, Peter J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-15T18:59:27Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationSuzuki, Satoru, Takako Takai-Igarashi, Yutaka Fukuoka, Dennis P. Wall, Hiroshi Tanaka, and Peter J. Tonellato. 2012. Systems analysis of inflammatory bowel disease based on comprehensive gene information. BMC Medical Genetics 13:25.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2350en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10417580
dc.description.abstractBackground: The rise of systems biology and availability of highly curated gene and molecular information resources has promoted a comprehensive approach to study disease as the cumulative deleterious function of a collection of individual genes and networks of molecules acting in concert. These "human disease networks" (HDN) have revealed novel candidate genes and pharmaceutical targets for many diseases and identified fundamental HDN features conserved across diseases. A network-based analysis is particularly vital for a study on polygenic diseases where many interactions between molecules should be simultaneously examined and elucidated. We employ a new knowledge driven HDN gene and molecular database systems approach to analyze Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Methods and Results: Based on drug indications for IBD, we determined sibling diseases of mild and severe states of IBD. Approximately 1,000 genes associated with the sibling diseases were retrieved from four databases. After ranking the genes by the frequency of records in the databases, we obtained 250 and 253 genes highly associated with the mild and severe IBD states, respectively. We then calculated functional similarities of these genes with known drug targets and examined and presented their interactions as PPI networks. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that this knowledge-based systems approach, predicated on functionally similar genes important to sibling diseases is an effective method to identify important components of the IBD human disease network. Our approach elucidates a previously unknown biological distinction between mild and severe IBD states.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/1471-2350-13-25en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3368714/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectinflammatory bowel diseaseen_US
dc.subjectIBDen_US
dc.subjectdisease related genesen_US
dc.subjectprotein-protein interaction networksen_US
dc.subjectGO based functional scoreen_US
dc.subjectinterpretation of pathogenesisen_US
dc.titleSystems Analysis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Based on Comprehensive Gene Informationen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalBMC Medical Geneticsen_US
dash.depositing.authorWall, Dennis Paul
dc.date.available2013-03-15T18:59:27Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2350-13-25*
dash.contributor.affiliatedWall, Dennis Paul
dash.contributor.affiliatedTonellato, Peter


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