Most Colorectal Cancer Survivors Live a Large Proportion of Their Remaining Life in Good Health

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Most Colorectal Cancer Survivors Live a Large Proportion of Their Remaining Life in Good Health

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Title: Most Colorectal Cancer Survivors Live a Large Proportion of Their Remaining Life in Good Health
Author: Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Thong, Melissa S. Y.; Nusselder, Wilma J.; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V.; Ezzati, Majid; Lamont, Elizabeth Bernier

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Citation: Soerjomataram, Isabelle, Melissa S. Y. Thong, Majid Ezzati, Elizabeth B. Lamont, Wilma J. Nusselder, and Lonneke V. van de Poll-Franse. 2012. Most colorectal cancer survivors live a large proportion of their remaining life in good health. Cancer Causes & Control 23(9): 1421-1428.
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Abstract: Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis reduces life expectancy and decreases patients’ well-being. We sought to assess the determinants of health and functional status and estimate the proportion of remaining life that CRC survivors would spend in good health. Methods Using Sullivan method, healthy life expectancy was calculated based on survival data of 14,849 CRC survivors within a population-based cancer registry in southern Netherlands and quality of life information among a random sample of these survivors (n = 1,291). Results: Overall, albeit short life expectancy (LE at age 50 = 12 years for males and 13 years for females), most CRC survivors spent a large proportion of their remaining life in good health (74 and 77 %, for males and females, respectively). Long-term survivors may expect to live a normal life span (LE at age 50 = 30 years) and spent a large proportion of the remaining life in good health (78 %). In distinction, those with stage IV CRC had less than 2 years to live and spent more than half of their remaining life in poor health. Conclusions: Most CRC patients may expect no compromise on living a healthy life, underlining the importance of early detection. On the other hand, the high proportion of non-healthy years among stage IV CRC survivors confirms the importance of early detection and palliative care. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0010-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0010-2
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3415614/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10463934
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