Patient Follow-Up After Participating in a Beach-Based Skin Cancer Screening Program

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Patient Follow-Up After Participating in a Beach-Based Skin Cancer Screening Program

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Title: Patient Follow-Up After Participating in a Beach-Based Skin Cancer Screening Program
Author: Puleo, Elaine; Hu, Stephanie W.; DeCristofaro, Susan; Greaney, Molly L.; Geller, Alan Charles; Werchniak, Andrew E.; Emmons, Karen Maria

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Citation: Greaney, Mary L., Elaine Puleo, Alan C. Geller, Stephanie W. Hu, Andrew E. Werchniak, Susan DeCristofaro, and Karen M. Emmons. 2012. Patient follow-up after participating in a beach-based skin cancer screening program. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 9(5): 1836-1845.
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Abstract: Many skin cancer screenings occur in non-traditional community settings, with the beach being an important setting due to beachgoers being at high risk for skin cancer. This study is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized trial of a skin cancer intervention in which participants (n = 312) had a full-body skin examination by a clinician and received a presumptive diagnosis (abnormal finding, no abnormal finding). Participants’ pursuit of follow-up was assessed post-intervention (n = 283). Analyses examined: (1) participant’s recall of screening results; and (2) whether cognitive and behavioral variables were associated with follow-up being as advised. Just 12% of participants (36/312) did not correctly recall the results of their skin examination. One-third (33%, 93/283) of participants’ follow-up was classified as being not as advised (recommend follow-up not pursued, unadvised follow-up pursued). Among participants whose follow-up was not as advised, 71% (66/93) did not seek recommended care. None of the measured behavioral and cognitive variables were significantly associated with recall of screening examination results or whether follow-up was as advised. Research is needed to determine what factors are associated with follow-up being as advised and to develop messages that increase receipt of advised follow-up care.
Published Version: doi:10.3390/ijerph9051836
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386590/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10489395
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