Circulating anti-angiogenic factors during hypertensive pregnancy and increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm neonates

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Circulating anti-angiogenic factors during hypertensive pregnancy and increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm neonates

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Title: Circulating anti-angiogenic factors during hypertensive pregnancy and increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm neonates
Author: Wang, Alice; Holston, Alexander M.; Yu, Kai F.; Zhang, Jun; Toporsian, Mourad; Karumanchi, Subbian Ananth; Levine, Richard J.

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Citation: Wang, Alice, Alexander M. Holston, Kai F. Yu, Jun Zhang, Mourad Toporsian, S. Ananth Karumanchi, and Richard J. Levine. 2012. Circulating anti-angiogenic factors during hypertensive pregnancy and increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm neonates. The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine 25(8): 1447-1452.
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Abstract: Objective: To test the hypothesis that high circulating concen-trations of maternal anti-angiogenic factors are associated with increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Study Design: This is a nested case-control study of nulliparous women who delivered less than 37 weeks of gestation within the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention (CPEP) trial. The study included 116 women with preeclampsia or gestational hyperten-sion and 323 normotensive controls. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1), placental growth factor (PlGF) and soluble endo-glin (sEng) in maternal serum were measured at 21–32 weeks of gestation. Results: Preterm infants born to hypertensive mothers were more likely to develop RDS (22.5% vs. 20.9%, p =0.03). After adjustment for gestational age at delivery, the odds ratio for the relationship between hypertension in pregnancy and RDS was 2.18 (95% CI 1.08–4.39). In hypertensive pregnancies women whose infants developed RDS had significantly higher circulating mean sFlt1 levels during midpregnancy (21–32 weeks of gestation) even after adjustment for gestational age at delivery (21,516 pg/mL vs. 7,000 pg/mL, p =0.01). Conclusions: Preterm preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, charac-terized by high circulating levels of sFlt1, are associated with a twofold increased risk of RDS in infants delivered before 37 weeks. Among women with these hypertensive pregnancies circulating sFlt1 concentrations during midpregnancy were substantially higher in women whose infants developed RDS.
Published Version: doi:10.3109/14767058.2011.640368
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3414194/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10498799
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