Plasma Concentrations of Soluble Endoglin versus Standard Evaluation in Patients with Suspected Preeclampsia

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Plasma Concentrations of Soluble Endoglin versus Standard Evaluation in Patients with Suspected Preeclampsia

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Title: Plasma Concentrations of Soluble Endoglin versus Standard Evaluation in Patients with Suspected Preeclampsia
Author: Rana, Sarosh; Cerdeira, Ana Sofia Teixeira de; Wenger, Julia; Salahuddin, Saira; Lim, Kee-Hak; Ralston, Steven Joseph; Thadhani, Ravi Ishwar; Karumanchi, Subbian Ananth

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Citation: Rana, Sarosh, Ana Sofia Cerdeira, Julia Wenger, Saira Salahuddin, Kee-Hak Lim, Steven J. Ralston, Ravi I. Thadhani, and S. Ananth Karumanchi. 2012. Plasma concentrations of soluble endoglin versus standard evaluation in patients with suspected preeclampsia. PLoS ONE 7(10): e48259.
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Abstract: Background: The purpose of this study was to compare plasma soluble endoglin (sEng) levels with standard clinical evaluation or plasma levels of other angiogenic proteins [soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PlGF)] in predicting short-term adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in women with suspected preeclampsia presenting prior to 34 weeks. Methods and Findings: Data from all women presenting at <34 weeks for evaluation of preeclampsia with singleton pregnancies (July 2009−October 2010) were included in this analysis and sEng levels were measured at presentation. Data was analyzed for 170 triage encounters and presented as median {25−75th centile}. Thirty-three percent of patients (56 of 170) experienced an adverse outcome. sEng levels (ng/ml) were significantly elevated in patients who subsequently experienced adverse outcomes compared to those who did not (32.3 {18.1, 55.8} vs 4.8 {3.2, 8.6}, p<0.0001). At a 10% false positive rate, sEng had higher detection rates of adverse outcomes than the combination of highest systolic blood pressure, proteinuria and abnormal laboratory tests (80.4 {70.0, 90.8} vs 63.8 {51.4, 76.2}, respectively). Subjects in the highest quartile of sEng were more likely to deliver early compared to those in the lowest quartile (HR: 14.96 95% CI: 8.73−25.62, p<0.0001). Natural log transformed sEng correlated positively with log sFlt1 levels (r = 0.87) and inversely with log PlGF levels (r = −0.79) (p<0.0001 for both). Plasma sEng had comparable area under the curve for prediction of adverse outcomes as measurement of sFlt1/PlGF ratio (0.88 {0.81, 0.95} for sEng versus 0.89 {0.83, 0.95} for sFlt1/PlGF ratio, p = 0.74). Conclusions: In women with suspected preeclampsia presenting prior to 34 weeks of gestation, sEng performs better than standard clinical evaluation in detecting adverse maternal and fetal outcomes occurring within two weeks of presentation. Soluble endoglin was strongly correlated with sFlt1 and PlGF levels, suggesting common pathogenic pathways leading to preeclampsia.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0048259
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3482204/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10510853
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