Simple filter microchip for rapid separation of plasma and viruses from whole blood

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Simple filter microchip for rapid separation of plasma and viruses from whole blood

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Title: Simple filter microchip for rapid separation of plasma and viruses from whole blood
Author: Wang, Shuqi; Sarenac, Dusan; Chen, Michael; Huang, Shih-Han; Giguel, Francoise F; Kuritzkes, Daniel Robert; Demirci, Utkan

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Citation: Wang, ShuQi, Dusan Sarenac, Michael H Chen, Shih-Han Huang, Francoise F Giguel, Daniel R Kuritzkes, and Utkan Demirci. 2012. Simple filter microchip for rapid separation of plasma and viruses from whole blood. International Journal of Nanomedicine 7: 5019-5028.
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Abstract: Sample preparation is a significant challenge for detection and sensing technologies, since the presence of blood cells can interfere with the accuracy and reliability of virus detection at the nanoscale for point-of-care testing. To the best of our knowledge, there is not an existing on-chip virus isolation technology that does not use complex fluidic pumps. Here, we presented a lab-on-a-chip filter device to isolate plasma and viruses from unprocessed whole blood based on size exclusion without using a micropump. We demonstrated that viruses (eg, HIV) can be separated on a filter-based chip (2-μm pore size) from HIV-spiked whole blood at high recovery efficiencies of 89.9% ± 5.0%, 80.5% ± 4.3%, and 78.2% ± 3.8%, for viral loads of 1000, 10,000 and 100,000 copies/mL, respectively. Meanwhile, 81.7% ± 6.7% of red blood cells and 89.5% ± 2.4% of white blood cells were retained on 2 μm pore–sized filter microchips. We also tested these filter microchips with seven HIV-infected patient samples and observed recovery efficiencies ranging from 73.1% ± 8.3% to 82.5% ± 4.1%. These results are first steps towards developing disposable point-of-care diagnostics and monitoring devices for resource-constrained settings, as well as hospital and primary care settings.
Published Version: doi:10.2147/IJN.S32579
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3457680/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10522937
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