Complex Structure of Engineered Modular Domains Defining Molecular Interaction between ICAM-1 and Integrin LFA-1

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Complex Structure of Engineered Modular Domains Defining Molecular Interaction between ICAM-1 and Integrin LFA-1

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Title: Complex Structure of Engineered Modular Domains Defining Molecular Interaction between ICAM-1 and Integrin LFA-1
Author: Kang, Sungkwon; Kim, Chae Un; Gu, Xiaoling; Owens, Roisin M.; van Rijn, Sarah J.; Boonyaleepun, Vanissra; Mao, Yuxin; Jin, Moonsoo M.; Springer, Timothy A.

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Citation: Kang, Sungkwon, Chae Un Kim, Xiaoling Gu, Roisin M. Owens, Sarah J. van Rijn, Vanissra Boonyaleepun, Yuxin Mao, Timothy A. Springer, and Moonsoo M. Jin. 2012. Complex structure of engineered modular domains defining molecular interaction between ICAM-1 and integrin LFA-1. PLoS ONE 7(8): e44124.
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Abstract: Intermolecular contacts between integrin LFA-1 (αLβ2) and ICAM-1 derive solely from the integrin αL I domain and the first domain (D1) of ICAM-1. This study presents a crystal structure of the engineered complex of the αL I domain and ICAM-1 D1. Previously, we engineered the I domain for high affinity by point mutations that were identified by a directed evolution approach. In order to examine αL I domain allostery between the C-terminal α7-helix (allosteric site) and the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (active site), we have chosen a high affinity variant without mutations directly influencing either the position of the α7-helix or the active sites. In our crystal, the αL I domain was found to have a high affinity conformation to D1 with its α7-helix displaced downward away from the binding interface, recapitulating a current understanding of the allostery in the I domain and its linkage to neighboring domains of integrins in signaling. To enable soluble D1 of ICAM-1 to fold on its own, we also engineered D1 to be functional by mutations, which were found to be those that would convert hydrogen bond networks in the solvent-excluded core into vdW contacts. The backbone structure of the β-sandwich fold and the epitope for I domain binding of the engineered D1 were essentially identical to those of wild-type D1. Most deviations in engineered D1 were found in the loops at the N-terminal region that interacts with human rhinovirus (HRV). Structural deviation found in engineered D1 was overall in agreement with the function of engineered D1 observed previously, i.e., full capacity binding to αL I domain but reduced interaction with HRV.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044124
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431320/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10533599
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