Prohypertensive Effect of Gestational Personal Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter. Prospective Cohort Study in Non-smoking and Non-obese Pregnant Women

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Prohypertensive Effect of Gestational Personal Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter. Prospective Cohort Study in Non-smoking and Non-obese Pregnant Women

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Title: Prohypertensive Effect of Gestational Personal Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter. Prospective Cohort Study in Non-smoking and Non-obese Pregnant Women
Author: Jedrychowski, Wieslaw A.; Perera, Frederica P.; Maugeri, Umberto; Spengler, John D.; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Stigter, Laura; Majewska, Renata; Kaim, Irena; Sowa, Agata; Jacek, Ryszard

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Citation: Jedrychowski, Wieslaw A., Frederica P. Perera, Umberto Maugeri, John Spengler, Elzbieta Mroz, Elzbieta Flak, Laura Stigter, Renata Majewska, Irena Kaim, Agata Sowa, and Ryszard Jacek. 2012. Prohypertensive effect of gestational personal exposure to fine particulate matter. Prospective cohort study in non-smoking and non-obese pregnant women. Cardiovascular Toxicology 12(3): 216-225.
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Abstract: Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) is a recognized risk factor for elevated blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease in adults, and this prospective cohort study was undertaken to evaluate whether gestational exposure to \(PM_{2.5}\) has a prohypertensive effect. We measured personal exposure to fine particulate matter (\(PM_{2.5}\)) by personal air monitoring in the second trimester of pregnancy among 431 women, and BP values in the third trimester were obtained from medical records of prenatal care clinics. In the general estimating equation model, the effect of \(PM_{2.5}\) on BP was adjusted for relevant covariates such as maternal age, education, parity, gestational weight gain (GWG), prepregnancy BMI, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and blood lead level. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased in a linear fashion across a dosage of \(PM_{2.5}\) and on average augmented by 6.1 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.6–11.6) with log unit of \(PM_{2.5}\) concentration. Effects of age, maternal education, prepregnancy BMI, blood lead level, and ETS were insignificant. Women with excessive gestational weight gain (>18 kg) had higher mean SBP parameters by 5.5 mmHg (95% CI, 2.7–8.3). In contrast, multiparous women had significantly lower SBP values (coeff. = −4.2 mm Hg; 95% CI, −6.8 to −1.6). Similar analysis performed for diastolic blood pressure (DBP) has demonstrated that PM2.5 also affected DBP parameters (coeff. = 4.1; 95% CI, −0.02 to 8.2), but at the border significance level. DBP values were positively associated with the excessive GWG (coeff. = 2.3; 95% CI, 0.3–4.4) but were inversely related to parity (coeff. = −2.7; 95% CI, −4.6 to −0.73). In the observed cohort, the exposure to fine particulate matter during pregnancy was associated with increased maternal blood pressure.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s12012-012-9157-z
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3404286/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10576038
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