The Effects of Inorganic Nitrogen form and \(CO_2\) Concentration on Wheat Yield and Nutrient Accumulation and Distribution

DSpace/Manakin Repository

The Effects of Inorganic Nitrogen form and \(CO_2\) Concentration on Wheat Yield and Nutrient Accumulation and Distribution

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: The Effects of Inorganic Nitrogen form and \(CO_2\) Concentration on Wheat Yield and Nutrient Accumulation and Distribution
Author: Carlisle, Eli; Myers, Samuel Skipworth; Raboy, Victor; Bloom, Arnold

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Carlisle, Eli, Samuel Myers, Victor Raboy, and Arnold Bloom. 2012. The effects of inorganic nitrogen form and \(CO_2\) concentration on wheat yield and nutrient accumulation and distribution. Frontiers in Plant Science 3:195.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Inorganic N is available to plants from the soil as ammonium (\(NH^+_4\)) and nitrate (\(NO^-_3\)). We studied how wheat grown hydroponically to senescence in controlled environmental chambers is affected by N form (\(NH^+_4\) vs. \(NO^-_3\)) and \(CO_2\) concentration (“subambient,” “ambient,” and “elevated”) in terms of biomass, yield, and nutrient accumulation and partitioning. Wheat supplied with \(NH^+_4\) as a sole N source had the strongest response to \(CO_2\) concentration. Plants exposed to subambient and ambient \(CO_2\) concentrations typically had the greatest biomass and nutrient accumulation under both N forms. In general \(NH^+_4\)-supplied plants had higher concentrations of total N, P, K, S, Ca, Zn, Fe, and Cu, while \(NO^-_3\)-supplied plants had higher concentrations of Mg, B, Mn, and \(NO^-_3\) - N. \(NH^+_4\)-supplied plants contained amounts of phytate similar to \(NO^-_3\)-supplied plants but had higher bioavailable Zn, which could have consequences for human health. \(NH^+_4\)-supplied plants allocated more nutrients and biomass to aboveground tissues whereas \(NO^+_3\)-supplied plants allocated more nutrients to the roots. The two inorganic nitrogen forms influenced plant growth and nutrient status so distinctly that they should be treated as separate nutrients. Moreover, plant growth and nutrient status varied in a non-linear manner with atmospheric \(CO_2\) concentration.
Published Version: doi:10.3389/fpls.2012.00195
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3432492/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10579045
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters