Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies

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Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies

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Title: Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies
Author: Nyberg, S T; Heikkilä, K; Fransson, E I; Alfredsson, L; De Bacquer, D; Bjorner, J B; Bonenfant, S; Borritz, M; Burr, H; Casini, A; Clays, E; Dragano, N; Erbel, R; Geuskens, G A; Goldberg, M; Hooftman, W E; Houtman, I L; Jöckel, K-H; Kittel, F; Knutsson, A; Koskenvuo, M; Leineweber, C; Lunau, T; Madsen, I E H; Hanson, L L Magnusson; Marmot, Michael Gideon; Nielsen, M L; Nordin, M; Oksanen, T; Pentti, J; Rugulies, R; Siegrist, J; Suominen, S; Vahtera, J; Virtanen, M; Westerholm, P; Westerlund, H; Zins, M; Ferrie, J E; Theorell, T; Steptoe, A; Hamer, M; Singh-Manoux, A; Batty, G D; Kivimäki, M

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Citation: Nyberg, S T, K Heikkilä, E I Fransson, L Alfredsson, D De Bacquer, J B Bjorner, S Bonenfant, et al. 2011. Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies. Journal of Internal Medicine 272(1): 65-73.
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Abstract: Background: Evidence of an association between job strain and obesity is inconsistent, mostly limited to small-scale studies, and does not distinguish between categories of underweight or obesity subclasses. Objectives: To examine the association between job strain and body mass index (BMI) in a large adult population. Methods We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis based on individual-level data from 13 European studies resulting in a total of 161 746 participants (49% men, mean age, 43.7 years). Longitudinal analysis with a median follow-up of 4 years was possible for four cohort studies (n = 42 222). Results: A total of 86 429 participants were of normal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg m−2), 2149 were underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg m−2), 56 572 overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg m−2) and 13 523 class I (BMI 30–34.9 kg m−2) and 3073 classes II/III (BMI ≥ 35 kg m−2) obese. In addition, 27 010 (17%) participants reported job strain. In cross-sectional analyses, we found increased odds of job strain amongst underweight [odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00–1.25], obese class I (odds ratio 1.07, 95% CI 1.02–1.12) and obese classes II/III participants (odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.28) as compared with participants of normal weight. In longitudinal analysis, both weight gain and weight loss were related to the onset of job strain during follow-up. Conclusions: In an analysis of European data, we found both weight gain and weight loss to be associated with the onset of job strain, consistent with a ‘U’-shaped cross-sectional association between job strain and BMI. These associations were relatively modest; therefore, it is unlikely that intervention to reduce job strain would be effective in combating obesity at a population level.
Published Version: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.x
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3437471/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10579080
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