Disruption of TNFα/TNFR1 function in resident skin cells impairs host immune response against cutaneous vaccinia virus infection

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Disruption of TNFα/TNFR1 function in resident skin cells impairs host immune response against cutaneous vaccinia virus infection

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Title: Disruption of TNFα/TNFR1 function in resident skin cells impairs host immune response against cutaneous vaccinia virus infection
Author: Tian, Tian; Dubin, Krista; Jin, Qiushuang; Qureshi, Ali; King, Sandra L.; Liu, Luzheng; Jiang, Xiaodong; Murphy, George F.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C.

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Citation: Tian, Tian, Krista Dubin, Qiushuang Jin, Ali Qureshi, Sandra L. King, Luzheng Liu, Xiaodong Jiang, George F. Murphy, Thomas S. Kupper, and Robert C. Fuhlbrigge. 2012. Disruption of TNFα/TNFR1 function in resident skin cells impairs host immune response against cutaneous vaccinia virus infection. The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 132(5): 1425-1434.
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Abstract: One strategy adopted by vaccinia virus (VV) to evade the host immune system is to encode homologs of TNF receptors (TNFR) that block TNFα function. The response to VV skin infection under conditions of TNFα deficiency, however, has not been reported. We found that TNFR1−/− mice developed larger primary lesions, numerous satellite lesions and higher skin virus levels after VV scarification. Following their recovery, these TNFR1−/− mice were fully protected against challenge with a lethal intranasal dose of VV, suggesting these mice developed an effective memory immune response. A functional systemic immune response of TNFR1−/− mice was further demonstrated by enhanced production of VV-specific IFNγ and VV-specific CD8+ T cells in spleens and draining lymph nodes. Interestingly, bone marrow (BM) reconstitution studies using WT BM in TNFR1−/− host mice, but not TNFR1−/− BM in WT host mice, reproduced the original results seen in TNFR1−/− mice, indicating that TNFR1 deficiency in resident skin cells, rather than hematopoietic cells, accounts for the impaired cutaneous immune response. Our data suggest that lack of TNFR1 leads to a skin-specific immune deficiency and that resident skin cells play a crucial role in mediating an optimal immune defense to VV cutaneous infection via TNFα/TNFR1 signaling.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/jid.2011.489
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3326195/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10579378
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