Mannose-Binding Lectin Regulates Host Resistance and Pathology during Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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Mannose-Binding Lectin Regulates Host Resistance and Pathology during Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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Title: Mannose-Binding Lectin Regulates Host Resistance and Pathology during Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi
Author: Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Gibson, Amanda; Cheever, Allen W.; Ezekowitz, R. Alan B.; Takahashi, Kazue; Steindel, Mario; Sher, Alan; Báfica, André

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Citation: Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti, Ester Roffê, Amanda Gibson, Allen W. Cheever, R. Alan B. Ezekowitz, Kazue Takahashi, Mario Steindel, Alan Sher, and André Báfica. 2012. Mannose-binding lectin regulates host resistance and pathology during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. PLoS ONE 7(11): e47835.
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Abstract: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a humoral pattern-recognition molecule important for host defense. Although recent genetic studies suggest an involvement of MBL/MASP2-associated pathways in Chagas’ disease, it is currently unknown whether MBL plays a role in host resistance to the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. In this study we employed MBL−/− mice to assess the role of MBL in resistance to experimental infection with T. cruzi. T. cruzi infection enhanced tissue expression of MBL both at the mRNA and protein level. Similarly, symptomatic acute Chagas’ disease patients displayed increased serum concentrations of MBL compared to patients with indeterminate, asymptomatic forms of the disease. Furthermore, increased parasite loads in the blood and/or tissue were observed in MBL−/− mice compared to WT controls. This was associated with reduced systemic levels of IL-12/23p40 in MBL−/− mice. Importantly, MBL−/− mice infected with a cardiotropic strain of T. cruzi displayed increased myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis compared to WT controls. The latter was accompanied by elevated hydroxyproline content and mRNA levels of collagen-1 and -6 in the heart. These observations point to a previously unappreciated role for MBL in regulating host resistance and cardiac inflammation during infection with a major human pathogen.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047835
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3490958/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10581967
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