Activated mouse \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells facilitate melanoma metastasis via Qa-1-dependent suppression of NK-cell cytotoxicity

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Activated mouse \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells facilitate melanoma metastasis via Qa-1-dependent suppression of NK-cell cytotoxicity

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Title: Activated mouse \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells facilitate melanoma metastasis via Qa-1-dependent suppression of NK-cell cytotoxicity
Author: Wang, Xiaojuan; Cui, Yanyan; Luo, Gaoxing; Wang, Qinghong; Hu, Jie; He, Weifeng; Yuan, Jun; Zhou, Junyi; Wu, Yan; Sun, Xiaofeng; Robson, Simon C; Li, Xianchang; Tan, Jiangling; Peng, Yanmeng; Xue, Gang; Lu, Linrong; Gao, Wenda; Wu, Jun

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Citation: Wang, Xiaojuan, Yanyan Cui, Gaoxing Luo, Qinghong Wang, Jie Hu, Weifeng He, Jun Yuan, et al. 2012. Activated mouse \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells facilitate melanoma metastasis via Qa-1-dependent suppression of NK-cell cytotoxicity. Cell Research 22(12): 1696-1706.
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Abstract: The regulatory activities of mouse \(CD^4+Foxp3^+\) T cells on various immune cells, including NK cells, have been well documented. Under some conditions, conventional \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells in the periphery are able to acquire inhibitory function on other T cells, but their roles in controlling innate immune cells are poorly defined. As a potential cellular therapy for cancer, ex vivo activated \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) effector T cells are often infused back in vivo to suppress tumor growth and metastasis. Whether such activated T cells could affect NK-cell control of tumorigenesis is unclear. In the present study, we found that mitogen-activated \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells exhibited potent suppressor function on NK-cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in vitro, and notably facilitated B16 melanoma metastasis in vivo. Suppression of NK cells by activated \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells is cell-cell contact dependent and is mediated by Qa-1:NKG2A interaction, as administration of antibodies blocking either Qa-1 or NKG2A could completely reverse this suppression, and significantly inhibited otherwise facilitated melanoma metastasis. Moreover, activated \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) cells from Qa-1 knockout mice completely lost the suppressor activity on NK cells, and failed to facilitate melanoma metastasis when transferred in vivo. Taken together, our findings indicate that innate anti-tumor response is counter regulated by the activation of adaptive immunity, a phenomenon we term as “activation-induced inhibition”. Thus, the regulatory role of activated \(CD4^+Foxp3^−\) T cells in NK-cell activity must be taken into consideration in the future design of cancer therapies.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/cr.2012.128
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3515753/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10582119
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