A Systemically-Administered Small Molecule Antagonist of CCR9 Acts as a Tissue-Selective Inhibitor of Lymphocyte Trafficking

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A Systemically-Administered Small Molecule Antagonist of CCR9 Acts as a Tissue-Selective Inhibitor of Lymphocyte Trafficking

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Title: A Systemically-Administered Small Molecule Antagonist of CCR9 Acts as a Tissue-Selective Inhibitor of Lymphocyte Trafficking
Author: Tubo, Noah J.; Wurbel, Marc A.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Schall, Thomas J.; Walters, Matthew J.; Campbell, James J.

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Citation: Tubo, Noah J., Marc A. Wurbel, Trevor T. Charvat, Thomas J. Schall, Matthew J. Walters, and James J. Campbell. 2012. A systemically-administered small molecule antagonist of CCR9 acts as a tissue-selective inhibitor of lymphocyte trafficking. PLoS ONE 7(11): e50498.
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Abstract: A goal for developers of immunomodulatory drugs has long been a systemically administered small molecule that can selectively inhibit inflammation in specific tissues. The chemokine receptor CCR9 is an attractive target for this approach, as entry of T cells into the small intestine from blood requires interaction between CCR9 and its ligand CCL25. We have tested the ability of a small molecule CCR9 antagonist, CCX8037, to inhibit antigen-mediated T cell accumulation in the intestine. This compound prevented accumulation of gut-imprinted antigen-specific CD8 T cells within epithelium of the small intestine. Interestingly, the antagonist did not affect the robust generation of gut-imprinted CD8 T cells within mesenteric lymph nodes. To distinguish “gut-selective” from “general” T cell inhibition, we tested the drug’s ability to influence accumulation of T cells within skin, a tissue in which CCR9 plays no known role, and we found no appreciable effect. This study demonstrates the feasibility of creating systemically-administered pharmaceuticals capable of tissue-selective immune modulation. This proof of concept is of utmost importance for designing effective treatments against various autoimmune disorders localized to a specific tissue.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0050498
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510197/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10587323
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