Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

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Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

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Title: Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
Author: Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles Benjamin; Grant, P. Ellen; Borsook, David

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Citation: Linnman, Clas, Lino Becerra, Alyssa Lebel, Charles Berde, P. Ellen Grant, and David Borsook. 2013. Transient and persistent pain induced connectivity alterations in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome. PLoS ONE 8(3): e57205.
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Abstract: Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0057205
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3602432/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10591651
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