Interactions between Affective and Cognitive Processing Systems in Problematic Gamblers: A Functional Connectivity Study

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Interactions between Affective and Cognitive Processing Systems in Problematic Gamblers: A Functional Connectivity Study

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Title: Interactions between Affective and Cognitive Processing Systems in Problematic Gamblers: A Functional Connectivity Study
Author: van Holst, Ruth J.; van der Meer, Johan N.; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J.; Goudriaan, Anna E.; McLaren, Donald George

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Citation: van Holst, Ruth J., Johan N. van der Meer, Donald George McLaren, Wim van den Brink, Dick J. Veltman, and Anna E. Goudriaan. 2012. Interactions between affective and cognitive processing systems in problematic gamblers: A functional connectivity study. PLoS ONE 7(11): e49923.
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Abstract: Background: Motivational and cognitive abnormalities are frequently reported in pathological gambling. However, studies simultaneously investigating motivational and cognitive processing in problematic gamblers are lacking, limiting our understanding of the interplay between these systems in problematic gambling. Studies in non-clinical samples indicate that interactions between dorsal “executive” and ventral “affective” processing systems are necessary for adequate responses in various emotive situations. Methods: We conducted a generalized Psycho-Physiological Interaction (gPPI) analysis to assess the influence of affective stimuli on changes in functional connectivity associated with response inhibition in 16 treatment seeking problematic gamblers (PRGs) and 15 healthy controls (HCs) using an affective Go-NoGo fMRI paradigm including neutral, gambling-related, positive and negative pictures as neutral and affective conditions. Results: Across groups, task performance accuracy during neutral inhibition trials was positively correlated with functional connectivity between the left caudate and the right middle frontal cortex. During inhibition in the gambling condition, only in PRGs accuracy of task performance was positively correlated with functional connectivity within sub-regions of the dorsal executive system. Group interactions showed that during neutral inhibition, HCs exhibited greater functional connectivity between the left caudate and occipital cortex than PRGs. In contrast, during inhibition in the positive condition, PRGs compared to HCs showed greater functional connectivity between the left caudate and occipital cortex. During inhibition trials in the negative condition, a stronger functional connectivity between the left caudate and the right anterior cingulate cortex in PRGs compared to HCs was present. There were no group interactions during inhibition in the gambling condition. Conclusions: During gamble inhibition PRGs seem to benefit more from functional connectivity within the dorsal executive system than HCs, because task accuracy in this condition in PRGs is positively correlated with functional connectivity, although the groups show similar connectivity patterns during gamble inhibition. Greater functional connectivity between the ventral affective system and the dorsal executive system in PRGs in the affective conditions compared to HCs, suggests facilitation of the dorsal executive system when affective stimuli are present specifically in PRGs.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0049923
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3509135/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10592478
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