Hypercalcemia Associated with a Malignant Brenner Tumor Arising from a Mature Cystic Teratoma

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Hypercalcemia Associated with a Malignant Brenner Tumor Arising from a Mature Cystic Teratoma

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Title: Hypercalcemia Associated with a Malignant Brenner Tumor Arising from a Mature Cystic Teratoma
Author: Honigberg, Michael; Bradford, Leslie Siriya; Prabhakar, Anand M; Hariri, Lida Pamela; Goodman, Annekathryn

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Citation: Honigberg, Michael, Leslie Siriya Bradford, Anand M. Prabhakar, Lida Pamela Hariri, and Annekathryn Goodman. 2012. Hypercalcemia associated with a malignant Brenner tumor arising from a mature cystic teratoma. Case Reports in Oncology 5(3): 592-600.
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Abstract: A 60-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and weight loss and was found to have serum calcium of 15.0 mg/dl. Serum parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) returned elevated. Imaging suggested bilateral mature cystic teratomas. Her hypercalcemia was treated initially with intravenous saline, as well as intramuscular and subcutaneous calcitonin. She underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and final pathology revealed malignant Brenner tumor in association with a mature cystic teratoma. Her postoperative PTHrP returned less than assay, and her total and ionized calcium fell below normal, requiring supplemental calcium and vitamin D. At follow-up one month after discharge, her calcium had normalized. We present the first reported case of hypercalcemia occurring in association with a malignant Brenner tumor. Malignancy-associated hypercalcemia occurs via four principal mechanisms: (1) tumor production of PTHrP; (2) osteolytic bone involvement by primary tumor or metastasis; (3) ectopic activation of vitamin D to \(1,25-(OH)_2\) vitamin D, and (4) ectopic production of parathyroid hormone. PTHrP-mediated hypercalcemia is the most common mechanism and was responsible in this case. In patients with paraneoplastic hypercalcemia who undergo surgical treatment, close monitoring and management of serum calcium is necessary both pre- and postoperatively.
Published Version: doi:10.1159/000345294
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3506083/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10611791
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