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dc.contributor.authorAlbouy, Geneviève
dc.contributor.authorFogel, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorPottiez, Hugo
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Vo An
dc.contributor.authorRay, Laura
dc.contributor.authorLungu, Ovidiu
dc.contributor.authorCarrier, Julie
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Edwin Malcolm
dc.contributor.authorDoyon, Julien
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-08T21:13:58Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationAlbouy, Geneviève, Stuart Fogel, Hugo Pottiez, Vo An Nguyen, Laura Ray, Ovidiu Lungu, Julie Carrier, Edwin Malcolm Robertson, and Julien Doyon. 2013. Daytime sleep enhances consolidation of the spatial but not motoric representation of motor sequence memory. PLoS ONE 8(1): e52805.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10612896
dc.description.abstractMotor sequence learning is known to rely on more than a single process. As the skill develops with practice, two different representations of the sequence are formed: a goal representation built under spatial allocentric coordinates and a movement representation mediated through egocentric motor coordinates. This study aimed to explore the influence of daytime sleep (nap) on consolidation of these two representations. Through the manipulation of an explicit finger sequence learning task and a transfer protocol, we show that both allocentric (spatial) and egocentric (motor) representations of the sequence can be isolated after initial training. Our results also demonstrate that nap favors the emergence of offline gains in performance for the allocentric, but not the egocentric representation, even after accounting for fatigue effects. Furthermore, sleep-dependent gains in performance observed for the allocentric representation are correlated with spindle density during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep of the post-training nap. In contrast, performance on the egocentric representation is only maintained, but not improved, regardless of the sleep/wake condition. These results suggest that motor sequence memory acquisition and consolidation involve distinct mechanisms that rely on sleep (and specifically, spindle) or simple passage of time, depending respectively on whether the sequence is performed under allocentric or egocentric coordinates.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0052805en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3534707/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurological Systemen_US
dc.subjectMotor Systemsen_US
dc.subjectPhysiological Processesen_US
dc.subjectSleepen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeurophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectLearning and Memoryen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectAnatomyen_US
dc.subjectPhysiologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral Sciencesen_US
dc.titleDaytime Sleep Enhances Consolidation of the Spatial but Not Motoric Representation of Motor Sequence Memoryen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen_US
dash.depositing.authorRobertson, Edwin Malcolm
dc.date.available2013-05-08T21:13:58Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0052805*
dash.contributor.affiliatedRobertson, Edwin Malcolm


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