Genetic Predisposition to Dyslipidemia and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Two Prospective Cohorts

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Genetic Predisposition to Dyslipidemia and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Two Prospective Cohorts

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Title: Genetic Predisposition to Dyslipidemia and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Two Prospective Cohorts
Author: Qi, Qibin; Liang, Liming; Doria, Alessandro; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

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Citation: Qi, Qibin, Liming Liang, Alessandro Doria, Frank B. Hu, and Lu Qi. 2012. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes risk in two prospective cohorts. Diabetes 61(3): 745-752.
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Abstract: Dyslipidemia has been associated with type 2 diabetes, but it remains unclear whether dyslipidemia plays a causal role in type 2 diabetes. We aimed to examine the association between the genetic predisposition to dyslipdemia and type 2 diabetes risk. The current study included 2,447 patients with type 2 diabetes and 3,052 control participants of European ancestry from the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia was estimated by three genotype scores of lipids (LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) on the basis of the established loci for blood lipids. Linear relation analysis indicated that the HDL cholesterol and triglyceride genotype scores, but not the LDL cholesterol genotype score, were linearly related to elevated type 2 diabetes risk. Each point of the HDL cholesterol and triglyceride genotype scores was associated with a 3% (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% CI 1.01–1.04]) and a 2% (1.02 [1.00–1.04]) increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, respectively. The ORs were 1.39 (1.17–1.65) and 1.19 (1.01–1.41) for type 2 diabetes by comparing extreme quartiles of the HDL cholesterol genotype score and triglyceride genotype score, respectively. In conclusion, genetic predisposition to low HDL cholesterol or high triglycerides is related to elevated type 2 diabetes risk.
Published Version: doi:10.2337/db11-1254
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3282815/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10642217
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