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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Melissa Marie
dc.contributor.authorHoarfrost, Adrienne L.
dc.contributor.authorBose, Arpita
dc.contributor.authorJoye, Samantha B.
dc.contributor.authorGirguis, Peter R.
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-20T20:51:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2013-05-15T12:18:33-04:00
dc.identifier.citationAdams, Melissa Marie, Adrienne L. Hoarfrost, Arpita Bose, Samantha B. Joye, and Peter R. Girguis. 2013. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: Potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity. Frontiers in Microbiology 4:110.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-302Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10646404
dc.description.abstractShort-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane \((C_2)\), propane \((C_3)\), and butane \((C_4)\) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane \((C_1)\). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of \(C_1–C_4\) alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized \(C_1–C_4\) alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and \(75^{\circ}C\)) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for \(C_1–C_4\) alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of \(C_2–C_4\) alkanes. Maximum \(C_1–C_4\) alkane oxidation rates occurred at \(55^{\circ}C\), which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, \(C_3\) was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then \(C_4\), \(C_2\), and \(C_1\), respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of \(C_2–C_4\) alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of \(C_1\) derived from these hydrothermal systems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOrganismic and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3389/fmicb.2013.00110en_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjecthydrothermal venten_US
dc.subjectmetalliferous sedimentsen_US
dc.subjectJuan de Fuca Ridgeen_US
dc.subjectshort-chain alkanesen_US
dc.subjectsulfate reductionen_US
dc.titleAnaerobic Oxidation of Short-Chain Alkanes in Hydrothermal Sediments: Potential Influences on Sulfur Cycling and Microbial Diversityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2013-05-15T16:18:39Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderMelissa M. Adams, Adrienne L. Hoarfrost, Arpita Bose, Samantha B. Joye, and Peter R. Girguis
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Microbiologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorGirguis, Peter R.
dc.date.available2013-05-20T20:51:33Z
dash.hope.year2013en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2013.00110*
dash.contributor.affiliatedAdams, Melissa Marie
dash.contributor.affiliatedBose, Arpita
dash.contributor.affiliatedGirguis, Peter


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