A Retrospective Cohort Study of U.S. Service Members Returning from Afghanistan and Iraq: Is Physical Health Worsening Over time?

DSpace/Manakin Repository

A Retrospective Cohort Study of U.S. Service Members Returning from Afghanistan and Iraq: Is Physical Health Worsening Over time?

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: A Retrospective Cohort Study of U.S. Service Members Returning from Afghanistan and Iraq: Is Physical Health Worsening Over time?
Author: Falvo, Michael J; Serrador, Jorge Manuel; McAndrew, Lisa M; Chandler, Helena K; Lu, Shou-En; Quigley, Karen S.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Falvo, Michael J., Jorge M. Serrador, Lisa M. McAndrew, Helena K. Chandler, Shou-En Lu, and Karen S. Quigley. 2012. A retrospective cohort study of U.S. service members returning from Afghanistan and Iraq: Is physical health worsening over time? BMC Public Health 12: 1124.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: High rates of mental health disorders have been reported in veterans returning from deployment to Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom: OEF) and Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom: OIF); however, less is known about physical health functioning and its temporal course post-deployment. Therefore, our goal is to study physical health functioning in OEF/OIF veterans after deployment. Methods: We analyzed self-reported physical health functioning as physical component summary (PCS) scores on the Veterans version of the Short Form 36 health survey in 679 OEF/OIF veterans clinically evaluated at a post-deployment health clinic. Veterans were stratified into four groups based on time post-deployment: (1Yr) 0 – 365 days; (2Yr) 366 – 730 days; (3Yr) 731 – 1095 days; and (4Yr+) > 1095 days. To assess the possibility that our effect was specific to a treatment-seeking sample, we also analyzed PCS scores from a separate military community sample of 768 OEF/OIF veterans evaluated pre-deployment and up to one-year post-deployment. Results: In veterans evaluated at our clinic, we observed significantly lower PCS scores as time post-deployment increased (p = 0.018) after adjusting for probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We similarly observed in our community sample that PCS scores were lower both immediately after and one year after return from deployment (p < 0.001) relative to pre-deployment PCS. Further, PCS scores obtained 1-year post-deployment were significantly lower than scores obtained immediately post-deployment (p = 0.02). Conclusion: In our clinical sample, the longer the duration between return from deployment and their visit to our clinic, the worse the Veteran’s physical health even after adjusting for PTSD. Additionally, a decline is also present in a military community sample of OEF/OIF veterans. These data suggest that, as time since deployment length increases, physical health may deteriorate for some veterans.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-1124
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3543837/pdf/
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/12/1124
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10859966
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters