Neural Correlates of Subjective Familiarity and Choice Bias during Episodic Memory Judgments

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Neural Correlates of Subjective Familiarity and Choice Bias during Episodic Memory Judgments

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Title: Neural Correlates of Subjective Familiarity and Choice Bias during Episodic Memory Judgments
Author: Vincent, Justin Lee
Citation: Vincent, Justin Lee. 2013. Neural Correlates of Subjective Familiarity and Choice Bias during Episodic Memory Judgments. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.
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Abstract: Successful recognition memory decisions depend on mnemonic and decision making processes that are computed by multiple, distributed brain areas. However, little is known about what computations these areas perform or how these areas are connected. Here, I collected behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans during the performance of an old-new recognition memory task with retrospective confidence judgments. Across runs, choice bias was successfully manipulated by providing rewards for correct responses that were either symmetric (equal reward for hits and correct rejections) or asymmetric (one response worth more than the other). Successful recognition memory was associated with activation in anterior prefrontal, parahippocampal, posterior cingulate, and parietal cortex. Resting state functional connectivity demonstrated that these brain areas are organized into two distinct networks. The first network includes parahippocampal cortex and angular gyrus. The second network includes lateral prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus. The hippocampal-cortical network was most active during old vs. new decisions, did not differentiate hits from false alarms, and was differentially active during low confidence old and new judgments. In contrast, while the frontoparietal network was robustly activated by hits, it was not activated during either false alarms or low confidence old judgments. Thus, these two distinct networks can be distinguished by their relative connectivity to the medial temporal lobe vs. lateral prefrontal cortex and their responses during uncertain old judgments and errors. The choice bias manipulation had opposing effects on the parietal components of these networks, which further suggests these networks make distinct contributions to mnemonic decision making.
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:10984872
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