Coordination of Individual and Ensemble Cytoskeletal Motors Studied Using Tools from DNA Nanotechnology

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Coordination of Individual and Ensemble Cytoskeletal Motors Studied Using Tools from DNA Nanotechnology

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Title: Coordination of Individual and Ensemble Cytoskeletal Motors Studied Using Tools from DNA Nanotechnology
Author: Derr, Nathan Dickson
Citation: Derr, Nathan Dickson. 2013. Coordination of Individual and Ensemble Cytoskeletal Motors Studied Using Tools from DNA Nanotechnology. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.
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Abstract: The cytoskeletal molecular motors kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein drive many diverse functions within eukaryotic cells. They are responsible for numerous spatially and temporally dependent intracellular processes crucial for cellular activity, including cytokinesis, maintenance of sub-cellular organization and the transport of myriad cargos along microtubule tracks. Cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-1 are processive, but opposite polarity, homodimeric motors; they each can take hundreds of thousands of consecutive steps, but do so in opposite directions along their microtubule tracks. These steps are fueled by the binding and hydrolysis of ATP within the homodimer's two identical protomers. Individual motors achieve their processivity by maintaining asynchrony between the stepping cycles of each protomer, insuring that at least one protomer always maintains contact with the track. How dynein coordinates the asynchronous stepping activity of its protomers is unknown. We developed a versatile method for assembling Saccharomyces cerevisiae dynein heterodimers, using complementary DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to dynein monomers labeled with different organic fluorophores. Using two-color, single-molecule microscopy and high-precision, two-dimensional tracking, we found that dynein has a highly variable stepping pattern that is distinct from all other processive cytoskeletal motors, which use "hand-over-hand" mechanisms. Uniquely, dynein stepping is stochastic when its two motor domains are close together. However, coordination emerges as the distance between motor domains increases, implying that a tension-based mechanism governs these steps. Many cellular cargos demonstrate bidirectional movement due to the presence of ensembles of both cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-1. To investigate the mechanisms that coordinate the interactions between motors within an ensemble, we constructed programmable synthetic cargos using three-dimensional DNA origami. This system enables varying numbers of DNA oligonucleotide-linked motors to be attached to the synthetic cargo, allowing for control of motor type, number, spacing, and orientation in vitro. In ensembles of one to seven identical- polarity motors, we found that motor number had minimal effect on directional velocity, whereas ensembles of opposite-polarity motors engaged in a tug-of-war resolvable by disengaging one motor species.
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11124852
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