Pleasure, Leisure, or Vice? Public Morality in Imperial Cairo, 1882-1949

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Pleasure, Leisure, or Vice? Public Morality in Imperial Cairo, 1882-1949

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Title: Pleasure, Leisure, or Vice? Public Morality in Imperial Cairo, 1882-1949
Author: Fonder, Nathan Lambert
Citation: Fonder, Nathan Lambert. 2013. Pleasure, Leisure, or Vice? Public Morality in Imperial Cairo, 1882-1949. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.
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Abstract: I investigate the social history of Egypt under British imperial occupation through the lens of morality in order to understand the contestation of cultural change and authority under empire. Points of cultural cleavage between European and local inhabitants in British-occupied Cairo included two customs, gambling and the consumption of intoxicants, which elicited sustained and dynamic reactions from observers of Egyptian society on the local and international level. I show that the presence of alcohol and gambling in public spaces in Cairo contributed directly to the politicization and selective criminalization of public morality. However, the meanings attributed to social practices relating to leisure were continually under negotiation and challenge as state authorities, British liberals, Egyptian reformers and religious leaders, foreign missionaries, and representatives of international temperance movements vied to impose their visions of morality upon Egyptian society.
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11151531
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