Machine Learning Prediction of Cancer Cell Sensitivity to Drugs Based on Genomic and Chemical Properties

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Machine Learning Prediction of Cancer Cell Sensitivity to Drugs Based on Genomic and Chemical Properties

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Title: Machine Learning Prediction of Cancer Cell Sensitivity to Drugs Based on Genomic and Chemical Properties
Author: Menden, Michael P.; Iorio, Francesco; Garnett, Mathew; McDermott, Ultan; Benes, Cyril Henri; Ballester, Pedro J.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

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Citation: Menden, Michael P., Francesco Iorio, Mathew Garnett, Ultan McDermott, Cyril H. Benes, Pedro J. Ballester, and Julio Saez-Rodriguez. 2013. Machine learning prediction of cancer cell sensitivity to drugs based on genomic and chemical properties. PLoS ONE 8(4): e61318.
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Abstract: Predicting the response of a specific cancer to a therapy is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to a personalised treatment. High-throughput screenings of potentially active compounds against a panel of genomically heterogeneous cancer cell lines have unveiled multiple relationships between genomic alterations and drug responses. Various computational approaches have been proposed to predict sensitivity based on genomic features, while others have used the chemical properties of the drugs to ascertain their effect. In an effort to integrate these complementary approaches, we developed machine learning models to predict the response of cancer cell lines to drug treatment, quantified through IC50 values, based on both the genomic features of the cell lines and the chemical properties of the considered drugs. Models predicted IC50 values in a 8-fold cross-validation and an independent blind test with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.72 and 0.64 respectively. Furthermore, models were able to predict with comparable accuracy (R2 of 0.61) IC50s of cell lines from a tissue not used in the training stage. Our in silico models can be used to optimise the experimental design of drug-cell screenings by estimating a large proportion of missing IC50 values rather than experimentally measuring them. The implications of our results go beyond virtual drug screening design: potentially thousands of drugs could be probed in silico to systematically test their potential efficacy as anti-tumour agents based on their structure, thus providing a computational framework to identify new drug repositioning opportunities as well as ultimately be useful for personalized medicine by linking the genomic traits of patients to drug sensitivity.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0061318
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3640019/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11179049
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