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dc.contributor.authorTorfadottir, Johanna E.
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur
dc.contributor.authorMucci, Lorelei Ann
dc.contributor.authorKasperzyk, Julie L.
dc.contributor.authorFall, Katja
dc.contributor.authorTryggvadottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Orn
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B.
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Eirikur
dc.contributor.authorTulinius, Hrafn
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorAdami, Hans-Olov
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-17T13:33:48Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationTorfadottir, Johanna E., Unnur A. Valdimarsdottir, Lorelei A. Mucci, Julie L. Kasperzyk, Katja Fall, Laufey Tryggvadottir, Thor Aspelund, et al. 2013. Consumption of fish products across the lifespan and prostate cancer risk. PLoS ONE 8(4): e59799.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11180385
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine whether fish and fish oil consumption across the lifespan is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer. Design: The study was nested among 2268 men aged 67–96 years in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort study. In 2002 to 2006, dietary habits were assessed, for early life, midlife and later life using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were followed for prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality through 2009 via linkage to nationwide cancer- and mortality registers. Adjusting for potential confounders, we used regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) for prostate cancer according to fish and fish oil consumption. Results: Among the 2268 men, we ascertained 214 prevalent and 133 incident prostate cancer cases, of which 63 had advanced disease. High fish consumption in early- and midlife was not associated with overall or advanced prostate cancer. High intake of salted or smoked fish was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer both in early life (95% CI: 1.08, 3.62) and in later life (95% CI: 1.04, 5.00). Men consuming fish oil in later life had a lower risk of advanced prostate cancer [HR (95%CI): 0.43 (0.19, 0.95)], no association was found for early life or midlife consumption. Conclusions: Salted or smoked fish may increase risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas fish oil consumption may be protective against progression of prostate cancer in elderly men. In a setting with very high fish consumption, no association was found between overall fish consumption in early or midlife and prostate cancer risk.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059799en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3629172/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectCancer Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectLifecourse Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectNutritionen_US
dc.subjectOncologyen_US
dc.subjectCancers and Neoplasmsen_US
dc.subjectGenitourinary Tract Tumorsen_US
dc.subjectProstate Canceren_US
dc.subjectCancer Risk Factorsen_US
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Healthen_US
dc.titleConsumption of Fish Products across the Lifespan and Prostate Cancer Risken_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen_US
dash.depositing.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur
dc.date.available2013-10-17T13:33:48Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0059799*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedValdimarsdottir, Unnur
dash.contributor.affiliatedAdami, Hans-Olov
dash.contributor.affiliatedMucci, Lorelei
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


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