Bidirectional Association Between Depression and Metabolic Syndrome

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Bidirectional Association Between Depression and Metabolic Syndrome

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Title: Bidirectional Association Between Depression and Metabolic Syndrome
Author: Pan, An; Keum, NaNa; Okereke, Olivia Ifeoma; Sun, Qi; Kivimaki, Mika; Rubin, Richard R.; Hu, Frank B.

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Citation: Pan, An, NaNa Keum, Olivia I. Okereke, Qi Sun, Mika Kivimaki, Richard R. Rubin, and Frank B. Hu. 2012. Bidirectional association between depression and metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Care 35(5): 1171-1180.
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Abstract: OBJECTIVE Epidemiological studies have repeatedly investigated the association between depression and metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize the current evidence from cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies that evaluated this association. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles published up to January 2012. Cross-sectional and cohort studies that reported an association between the two conditions in adults were included. Data on prevalence, incidence, unadjusted or adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% CI were extracted or provided by the authors. The pooled OR was calculated separately for cross-sectional and cohort studies using random-effects models. The I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. RESULTS The search yielded 29 cross-sectional studies (n = 155,333): 27 studies reported unadjusted OR with a pooled estimate of 1.42 (95% CI 1.28–1.57; I2 = 55.1%); 11 studies reported adjusted OR with depression as the outcome (1.27 [1.07–1.57]; I2 = 60.9%), and 12 studies reported adjusted OR with MetS as the outcome (1.34 [1.18–1.51]; I2 = 0%). Eleven cohort studies were found (2 studies reported both directions): 9 studies (n = 26,936 with 2,316 new-onset depression case subjects) reported adjusted OR with depression as the outcome (1.49 [1.19–1.87]; I2 = 56.8%), 4 studies (n = 3,834 with 350 MetS case subjects) reported adjusted OR with MetS as the outcome (1.52 [1.20–1.91]; I2 = 0%). CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate a bidirectional association between depression and MetS. These results support early detection and management of depression among patients with MetS and vice versa.
Published Version: doi:10.2337/dc11-2055
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3329841/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11180468
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