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dc.contributor.authorPan, An
dc.contributor.authorKeum, NaNa
dc.contributor.authorOkereke, Olivia Ifeoma
dc.contributor.authorSun, Qi
dc.contributor.authorKivimaki, Mika
dc.contributor.authorRubin, Richard R.
dc.contributor.authorHu, Frank B.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-17T14:46:50Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationPan, An, NaNa Keum, Olivia I. Okereke, Qi Sun, Mika Kivimaki, Richard R. Rubin, and Frank B. Hu. 2012. Bidirectional association between depression and metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Care 35(5): 1171-1180.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0149-5992en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11180468
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE Epidemiological studies have repeatedly investigated the association between depression and metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize the current evidence from cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies that evaluated this association. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles published up to January 2012. Cross-sectional and cohort studies that reported an association between the two conditions in adults were included. Data on prevalence, incidence, unadjusted or adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% CI were extracted or provided by the authors. The pooled OR was calculated separately for cross-sectional and cohort studies using random-effects models. The I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. RESULTS The search yielded 29 cross-sectional studies (n = 155,333): 27 studies reported unadjusted OR with a pooled estimate of 1.42 (95% CI 1.28–1.57; I2 = 55.1%); 11 studies reported adjusted OR with depression as the outcome (1.27 [1.07–1.57]; I2 = 60.9%), and 12 studies reported adjusted OR with MetS as the outcome (1.34 [1.18–1.51]; I2 = 0%). Eleven cohort studies were found (2 studies reported both directions): 9 studies (n = 26,936 with 2,316 new-onset depression case subjects) reported adjusted OR with depression as the outcome (1.49 [1.19–1.87]; I2 = 56.8%), 4 studies (n = 3,834 with 350 MetS case subjects) reported adjusted OR with MetS as the outcome (1.52 [1.20–1.91]; I2 = 0%). CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate a bidirectional association between depression and MetS. These results support early detection and management of depression among patients with MetS and vice versa.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Diabetes Associationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.2337/dc11-2055en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3329841/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectMeta-Analysisen_US
dc.titleBidirectional Association Between Depression and Metabolic Syndromeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalDiabetes Careen_US
dash.depositing.authorHu, Frank B.
dc.date.available2013-10-17T14:46:50Z
dc.identifier.doi10.2337/dc11-2055*
dash.contributor.affiliatedOkereke, Olivia
dash.contributor.affiliatedSun, Qi
dash.contributor.affiliatedKeum, NaNa
dash.contributor.affiliatedHu, Frank


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