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dc.contributor.authorSpector, Jonathan Michael
dc.contributor.authorReisman, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorLipsitz, Stuart Roger
dc.contributor.authorDesai, Priya
dc.contributor.authorGawande, Atul Atmaram
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-17T16:54:43Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationSpector, Jonathan M, Jonathan Reisman, Stuart Lipsitz, Priya Desai, and Atul A Gawande. 2013. Access to essential technologies for safe childbirth: a survey of health workers in Africa and Asia. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 13: 43.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11180991
dc.description.abstractBackground: The reliable availability of health technologies, defined as equipment, medicines, and consumable supplies, is essential to ensure successful childbirth practices proven to prevent avoidable maternal and newborn mortality. The majority of global maternal and newborn deaths take place in Africa and Asia, yet few data exist that describe the availability of childbirth-related health technologies in these regions. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of health workers in Africa and Asia in order to profile the availability of health technologies considered to be essential to providing safe childbirth care. Methods: Health workers in Africa and Asia were surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. A list of essential childbirth-related health technologies was drawn from World Health Organization guidelines for preventing and managing complications associated with the major causes of maternal and newborn mortality globally. Demographic data describing each birth center were obtained and health workers reported on the availability of essential childbirth-related health technologies at their centers. Comparison analyses were conducted using Rao-Scott chi-square test statistics. Results: Health workers from 124 birth centers in 26 African and 15 Asian countries participated. All facilities exhibited gaps in the availability of essential childbirth-related health technologies. Availability was significantly reduced in birth centers that had lower birth volumes and those from lower income countries. On average across all centers, health workers reported the availability of 18 of 23 essential childbirth-related health technologies (79%; 95% CI, 74%, 84%). Low-volume facilities suffered severe shortages; on average, these centers reported reliable availability of 13 of 23 technologies (55%; 95% CI, 39%, 71%). Conclusions: Substantial gaps exist in the availability of essential childbirth-related health technologies across health sector levels in Africa and Asia. Strategies that facilitate reliable access to vital health technologies in these regions are an urgent priority.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/1471-2393-13-43en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3637084/pdf/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectNeonatal mortalityen_US
dc.subjectMaternal mortalityen_US
dc.subjectChildbirthen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping worlden_US
dc.subjectHealth technologyen_US
dc.titleAccess to essential technologies for safe childbirth: a survey of health workers in Africa and Asiaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirthen_US
dash.depositing.authorReisman, Jonathan
dc.date.available2013-10-17T16:54:43Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2393-13-43*
dash.contributor.affiliatedReisman, Jonathan
dash.contributor.affiliatedSpector, Jonathan Michael
dash.contributor.affiliatedLipsitz, Stuart
dash.contributor.affiliatedGawande, Atul


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